Hairy London: the deluxe collectors’ edition

Hairy London by Stephen Palmer - the deluxe collectors' editionAvailable now!

We’re delighted to announce the deluxe collectors’ edition of Stephen Palmer’s wonderfully weird, and relentlessly hirsute, Hairy London.

A limited edition of fifty copies have been produced of this soft-covered hardback edition, perhaps the first time a book has come in its own fur coat.

Due to the natural finish, each copy varies slightly in appearance. If you have a preference for left, centre or right parting, please specify when ordering.

Beautifully produced, it’s time to get tactile with the hairiest novel we’ve read in a long time!

Available 1st April.

For enquiries about pricing and ordering this book, please contact infinity plus.


New titles from infinity plus

Two new novels just out from infinity plus: Hairy London by Stephen Palmer, a weird and wonderful retropunk Edwardian fantasy about the nature of love;  and from our infinite press imprint, Tomorrow by Nick Gifford, a young adult time travel thriller about a terrifying near future.

Details of all infinity plus books can be found at http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/

Hairy London by Stephen Palmer

Hairy London by Stephen Palmer

Available in paperback and ebook formats, March 2014
http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/book.php?book=sphairy

What is love?

One evening at the Suicide Club three gentlemen discuss this age old problem – and thus a wager is made. Dissolute fop Sheremy Pantomile, veteran philosopher Kornukope Wetherbee and down-on-his-luck Velvene Orchardtide all bet their fortunes on finding the answer amidst the dark alleys of a phantasmagorical Edwardian London.

But then, overnight, London Town is covered in hair. How the trio of adventurers cope with this unusual plague, and what conclusions they come to regarding love is the subject of this surreal, surprising and fast-paced novel.

And the East End threatens revolution…

“Stephen Palmer is a find.” Time Out

“Stephen Palmer’s imagination is fecund…” Interzone

 

 Tomorrow by Nick Gifford

Tomorrow by Nick Gifford

Available in paperback and ebook formats, February 2014
http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/book.php?book=ngtomorrow&imprint=ipress

Tomorrow: a future only you can see; a future only you can save…

When fifteen-year-old Luke’s father dies, his eccentric family threatens to descend into chaos. Luke distracts himself by helping to sort through his father’s belongings, a painful process which takes on an entirely new dimension when he discovers that his father had somehow had knowledge of events in his own future. This prescience is connected in some way to a recent spate of terrorist attacks, which would explain why security forces – and others – start to take an interest in Luke’s discovery. Just what had his father known, and why are Luke and his friends suddenly at the centre of it all?

Tomorrow: an emotion- and time-tangled thriller set in the War Against Chronological Terror.

Tomorrow: when three teenagers may have the power to save or destroy a world that is yet to be.

 

Praise for Nick Gifford’s work:

“The king of children’s horror” - Sunday Express

“Another great teen thriller.” Spot On

“Ingenious … this chilling story reads with all the power and demented logic of a thoroughly bad dream.” The Independent

“The pacing and plotting in this novel are superb. Twists and surprises occur at unpredictable intervals. And the ending is a blend of hope and menace … achieves a level of excellence equivalent to one of Ramsey Campbell’s books, neither condescending to his youthful readers nor slighting his adult ones. Now, that’s a truly scary accomplishment!” Asimov’s SF Magazine

“Guaranteed to scare your socks off.” Glasgow Herald

Tomorrow may never be the same again…

Other recent titles:

Nocturnes and Other Nocturnes by Claude LalumièreNocturnes and other Nocturnes by Claude Lalumière

Available in paperback and ebook formats, December 2013
http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/book.php?book=clnoct

Twenty-five dark stories that span a daring breadth of genres. In these noir tales that unfold at the edge of realism, mythic nocturnes from impossible pasts, and disquietingly intimate stories of speculative fiction, Claude Lalumière explores our collective and intertwined obsessions with sex and death.

“Claude Lalumière’s stories are dark, mordant, precisely formed.” Lucius Shepard

 

Flowercrash by Stephen Palmer Glass by Stephen Palmer Memory Seed by Stephen Palmer

Memory Seed by Stephen Palmer

Available in ebook formats, December 2013
http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/book.php?book=spmemsd

There is one city left, and soon that will be gone, for the streets of Kray are crumbling beneath a wave of exotic and lethal vegetation threatening to wipe out the last traces of humanity. In the desperate struggle for survival most Krayans live from day to day, awaiting salvation from their goddesses or the government. A compelling first novel set on a world both deadly and fascinating.

Glass by Stephen Palmer

Available in ebook formats, December 2013
http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/book.php?book=spglass

A plague is spreading through the city of Cray. Nobody knows its origin and nobody has discovered a cure. Cray is dying. Of glass. As the city’s ruling council resorts to increasingly desperate measures to maintain order, two people’s lives are about to change…

Flowercrash by Stephen Palmer

Available in ebook formats, December 2013
http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/book.php?book=spflwr

Zaïdmouth’s five communities are intertwined by artificial flower networks so complex they combine to create the virtual realities through which Zaïdmouth is run. Yet into this vivid world a bad seed is about to be sewn.

Expatria box set by Keith BrookeExpatria: the boxed set by Keith Brooke

Available in ebook formats, December 2013
http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/book.php?book=kbexpbox

A lost colony, rediscovered by descendants of its original investors… When the expedition from the Holy Corporation of GenGen arrives on Expatria, for some it looks like salvation from a backward-looking, superstition-ridden society, but for others, it looks suspiciously like an invasion.

 

 

Also of note

Published by infinite press in December 2013:

Piggies, Flesh and Blood, Like Father and Erased by Nick Gifford

Gifford’s first four young adult novels are now available in paperback and ebook formats.

Piggies by Nick Gifford Flesh and Blood by Nick Gifford Like Father by Nick Gifford Erased by Nick Gifford

Piggies

Available in paperback and ebook formats, December 2013
http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/book.php?book=ngpig&imprint=ipress

Transported to a world inhabited by vampires, Ben befriends a girl called Rachel. She takes him to her farm to prove she’s not like the other vampires, but that’s when he discovers a terrible secret. And why is the book called Piggies? That’s the worst horror of all. Optioned for film by Andy Serkis.

“Ingenious… this chilling story reads with all the power and demented logic of a thoroughly bad dream.” The Independent

Flesh and Blood

Available in paperback and ebook formats, December 2013
http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/book.php?book=ngfandb&imprint=ipress

Matt’s home life is falling to pieces as his mother seeks refuge from divorce by returning to the seaside town where she grew up. Separated from his friends, bored and discontented, Matt gradually becomes aware that his mother’s family are the keepers of a terrifying secret.

“Another great teen thriller.” Spot On

Like Father

Available in paperback and ebook formats, December 2013
http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/book.php?book=nglikef&imprint=ipress

Danny is terrified of being like his father, who ended up in prison after a night of savage violence. But then he finds his father’s diary and uncovers his dark thoughts – and even darker secrets. Who was whispering to his father, goading him, leading him on? And what if they are coming back for Danny?

“The king of children’s horror…” Sunday Express 

Erased

Available in paperback and ebook formats, December 2013
http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/book.php?book=ngerased&imprint=ipress

You’re not paranoid if they really are after you. Someone is messing with Liam’s world. All the rules have changed and his life has unravelled completely. What he does know is that someone is watching him. There are no bystanders in this terrifying game.

“An exciting, fast paced book that will have you on the edge of your seat until the last page.” Word Up

 

infinity plus for booksellers

An increasing number of our titles are also published in paperback and all of these are available to booksellers. If you’re a bookseller and would like to stock any of our books, have a look at our titles in print for details. All print titles are available via Ingrams, but if you’d prefer to deal directly with us just get in touch and we’ll work it out.

All print titles: http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/booksellers.php

 

Details of all infinity plus books can be found at http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/


Keeping good company: The Accord

The Accord by Keith BrookeWell, I was very flattered to see this feature at Kirkus Reviews on books that have lingered in the mind for years after reading. Alongside Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, PD James’s The Children of Men and Ursula Le Guin’s The Lathe of Heaven there is… The Accord by Keith Brooke.

The piece’s author, John De Nardo, has some lovely things to say about my novel, including:

Here’s a book so jam-packed with cool ideas it could have easily been the basis for multiple novels…

…It’s one of best treatments of posthumanism I’ve ever seen and its ideas are still bouncing around my head years later.

The book has had some of my best reviews. SF Site said it was “one of the finest novels of virtual reality yet written”, while the Guardian described it as “not only Brooke’s best novel to date, but one of the finest to broach the subject of virtual reality”. (It also features some of the most gruelling scenes I’ve ever written, all extrapolated from the novel’s VR premise, but perhaps that’s the subject of another post…)

It’s great to get that kind of response for a book, but I’m particularly touched to get a review like this latest one from Kirkus where it’s marked up for such a special mention.

Feeling pretty damned chuffed right now.

Oh yes, you can find out more about The Accord over on the infinity plus website.


Tomorrow… may never be the same again: New YA release by Nick Gifford

Just out: Tomorrow by Nick Gifford

Tomorrow by Nick Gifford - a young adult time-travel thrillerTomorrow: a future only you can see; a future only you can save…

When fifteen-year-old Luke’s father dies, his eccentric family threatens to descend into chaos. Luke distracts himself by helping to sort through his father’s belongings, a painful process which takes on an entirely new dimension when he discovers that his father had somehow had knowledge of events in his own future. This prescience is connected in some way to a recent spate of terrorist attacks, which would explain why security forces – and others – start to take an interest in Luke’s discovery. Just what had his father known, and why are Luke and his friends suddenly at the centre of it all?

Tomorrow: an emotion- and time-tangled thriller set in the War Against Chronological Terror.

Tomorrow: when three teenagers may have the power to save or destroy a world that is yet to be.

Praise for Nick Gifford’s work

“The king of children’s horror.” Sunday Express

“Another great teen thriller.” Spot On

“Ingenious … this chilling story reads with all the power and demented logic of a thoroughly bad dream.” The Independent

“A contemporary thriller with overtones of Orwell and Huxley about it.” Rhyl Journal

“A story that genuinely chills and chafes at ethical and moral certainty… Erased is a real romp of a read. That it equips readers with an awareness of the mechanics of inhumanity must be a step towards ensuring history’s mistakes are not repeated.”Achukareviews

“An exceptional new talent in children’s literature … a bold, shocking and completely unputdownable horror story.” Waterstone’s Books Quarterly

“The pacing and plotting in this novel are superb. Twists and surprises occur at unpredictable intervals. And the ending is a blend of hope and menace … achieves a level of excellence equivalent to one of Ramsey Campbell’s books, neither condescending to his youthful readers nor slighting his adult ones. Now, that’s a truly scary accomplishment!” Asimov’s SF Magazine

“Guaranteed to scare your socks off.” Glasgow Herald

Buy this ebook from: Amazon US - Amazon UK

Buy this book in print: Amazon US - Amazon UK - CreateSpace

Marc Tessier interviewed by Claude Lalumière

Nocturnes and Other Nocturnes by Claude LalumièreThe cover to my latest book, Nocturnes and Other Nocturnes (from Infinity Plus), features a collage by my friend Marc Tessier. I’m completely in love with that image; to my mind, it perfectly captures the mood of the book.

I’ve known Marc since 1989, the year I opened my first bookshop, Nebula, in Montreal. He was one of the many talented and fascinating people I got to meet during my years as a bookseller, a phase of my life that ended in 1998. I’ve been fortunate that our paths keep crossing. And I suspect there are more collaborations of various sorts in our future. Marc’s career, interests, and endeavours are multi-faceted, and I’m delighted, with this mini-interview, to give Infinity Plus readers a better glimpse at Marc’s work. To keep up with Marc, visit likeanacidtrip.blogspot.ca.

~

The Moon by Marc Tessier

CL: Marc, you’re a writer, a cartoonist, a photographer, a publisher, and a teacher. Knowing your body of work I see how all of these form a whole picture of who you are as an artist, but I’d like to hear in your own words how of all that fits together.

MT: I am reading a biography of Leonardo Da Vinci and there is the term Renaissance Man, which described artists that had to master very different skills in order to get a much fuller picture of the human creative landscape, Now, we say multi-media artists. I rather prefer the other term. To succeed, you have to do one thing and stick with it the rest of your life. I’d rather do many things and in the process get a much bigger kick out of life. Or maybe just doing one form of art would just bore me.

CL: Where were you born?

MT: In a town halfway between Montreal and Québec City called Drummondville. It was founded by an English general called Drummond but it is mostly French.

CL: What’s your first vivid memory of comics in your life?

MT: It’s really hard to tell; my mother had this huge collection of Spirou magazines from Belgium. Comics have always surrounded me. Vivid memories: The mystery of Atlantis, a Blake and Mortimer adventure by Edgar P. Jacobs, is the first comics that really grabbed me as a kid (mixing mystery, archeology, Sci-Fi and Belgian surrealism). I also had a very vivid dream as a kid in which I woke up after seeing the most beautiful comic strip ever created (it looked like a cross between Spanish painter Miro and Italian comic master Lorenzo Mattotti). I remember waking up and realizing that I had imagined it, that that potential was within me to create such beauty and I’m sure it’s why today I still love and publish comics.

Art by Marc TessierCL: How important is Montreal to your identity and practice as an artist? How about the Province of Québec? Or Canada? How do all those potential identities interact or come into play?

MT: I will give that to my parents: they were forward thinking. Both were bilingual and they took us to the States every summer. As a kid, I would watch English cartoons and read books in English very early. So, my French Québécois identity was fused with English culture (Kurt Vonnegut and Philip K. Dick are early influences). Montreal was the only place for me to wind up in because of that fun and exciting mix of cultures. That’s what I always liked about that famous Montreal comix scene in the nineties, the fact that there were no borders, French and English working together, mutual respect and admiration.

CL: What projects of your own are you working on right now?

MT: I just submitted two exhibit proposals, one to Le Mois de la photo à Montréal [The Montreal Month of Photography] and the other to the Maisons de la culture [Houses of Culture] in Montreal. My publishing activities take most of my time, so it’s fun to get back to photography. I just published Within Are Monsters (Ici sont les Monstres), a photo-novel that includes two chapters in comics drawn by Jean-Claude Amyot and Stanley Wany, taking place in an alternate reality where Kaiju like monsters have taken over the government and the economy. I am also working with comic artist Siris on a proposed graphic novel that would tell the extraordinary life story of surreal Québécois painter Jean Dallaire.

CL: What’s coming soon from Éditions Trip?

MT: A new issue of Trip magazine with over 300 pages featuring an international comics section and, that’s always a huge job to organize. Also there is a new book by Rupert Bottenberg that should be out in May for TCAF [Toronto Comics Art Festival]. A beautiful little art book with Taiwan artist Tang-Wei Hsu is also on the board (a project brought to us by Rupert Bottenberg through EN MASSE). Finally, for the end of the year, a new graphic novel by Louis Rémillard about an Iroquoi native returning home in 17th-century Québec.

Sunbating by Marc TessierEgypte cyclope by Marc Tessier

infinity plus highlight: Qinmeartha and the Girl-Child LoChi by John Grant

A disturbing fantasy of clashing realities from a Hugo- and World Fantasy Award-winning author

Qinmeartha and the Girl-Child LoChi by John Grant

Tarburton-on-the-Moor – just another sleepy Dartmoor village. Or so it seems to Joanna Gard when she comes to visit her elderly aunt here, until the fabric of the village begins, like her personal life, to unravel. The villagers become less and less substantial as she watches, the local church degenerates into a nexus of terrifying malevolence, siblings of a horrifyingly seductive family pull her inexorably towards them, elementals play with her terrors on the midnight moor … At last Joanna is compelled to realize that a duel of wills between eternal forces is being played out – that nothing, herself included, is what it seems to be. In this uncomfortably disturbing tale of clashing realities, Hugo- and World Fantasy Award-winning author John Grant skilfully juggles a strange, fantasticated cosmology with images from the darker side of the human soul.

Bonus Novella: “The Beach of the Drowned”
He thought he was booking himself in for a day’s idle sailing and lovemaking, and it would all have been fine except then a storm blew up out of nowhere, his girlfriend suffered a horrible death, and finally he himself was sucked under the waves. But death eluded him. Instead he found himself drawn to the beach where all drowned folk go, a place outside normal existence where the few people who retain their intelligence band together in the hopeless hope of finding their way back to the living world again. After all, legend says it was done once before …

More about Qinmeartha and the Girl-Child LoChi.

Extract

That night, hot though the night itself hadn’t seemed to be hot, Joanna dreamed.

She was in a place where the sky was always light, a single mass of brightness that arched all the way from one horizon to the other. She knew quite a lot about her situation in this place, but not really enough altogether to explain it. There was a sun somewhere in the dome of radiance, but it was lost in the general brilliance: the sun never set, and it touched the atmosphere of this world into shining with the same unremitting vigour as itself.

There was no escape from the light. Here and there rocks stuck up out of the desert, and there were one or two scrubby-looking plants, but they cast no shadows. The radiance was not especially hot, but it was so bright that it burnt her as painfully as red-hot tongs, seeming to flay away the cornea of the single eye that seemed to be the entirety of her body’s upper surface.

She slithered. It was the only way she could move. She could extend pseudopodia – indeed, she didn’t even have to think about doing so: it just happened – and then drag herself a few painful centimetres across the abrasive desert surface, looking for shadows that were not there so that she could hide in them from the light that would not permit her to hide. It was silly to go on searching, she knew that; but she was unable to take the decision just to stop where she was, to give up the hope. It was as if, wherever this hell was, she’d been condemned to spend the rest of eternity hunting for a relief that would never be granted.

It was a while before she realized she was not the only one here: although she couldn’t see anything out of her single upturned eye except the lurid fire, sometimes shadows moved at the extreme periphery of her vision. Once she’d observed a few of these she realized that she’d always known there were others of her kind. She was of the Wardrobe Folk, as were they; and it was the doom of the Wardrobe Folk to dwell in this arid misery forever.

Unless …

Unless the Girl-Child LoChi could come among them.

But Joanna, in her dream, didn’t know who the Girl-Child LoChi was, and didn’t know how she could find out. Lacking that knowledge, she was sapping the strength of her people in their attempts to bring the Girl-Child LoChi to their aid. She was at fault – every extra second that she and the other flat creatures like herself spent here was partly her responsibility.

Guilt. Too much of it for her mind to stay here.

She woke screaming in a tangle of bedclothes to find light pouring in through the bedroom window. She screamed at that, too, until she realized it was only the morning sunshine, and that she was in her own bedroom in Ashburton-by-the-Moor.

A few minutes later she was giggling unconvincedly. Just a nightmare. The Wardrobe Folk – next it would be the Pantry People or the Cupboard Under The Stairs Collective.

But the cold sweat all over her and the sheets and the blankets didn’t go away just because her rational mind was taking over its rightful functions once more.

She pulled herself out of bed.

Later she’d tell Aunt Jill all about this, and the two of them would laugh together at the silliness.

Buy this ebook from: Amazon US - Amazon UK - Amazon Canada - Barnes and Noble - Kobo - Apple - Smashwords - Robot Trading Company


Some nice mentions for infinity plus books

Fabulous review of Jason Erik Lundberg’s Strange Mammals from the Guardian:

“Jason Erik Lundberg’s third collection, Strange Mammals, gathers 25 short stories in which literary naturalism gives way to the surreal, the absurd and the magical… Lundberg has the enviable talent of achieving emotionally resonant effects within just a few pages.” Guardian

Meanwhile, James Everington was recently interviewed at Ravenous Reads, the piece introduced with this lovely reference to James’ recent infinity plus collection Falling Over:

“another fantastic collection which showed off Mr. Everington’s skills in the short fiction arena and made him a star in my eyes”

And over at Upcoming4.me this week, Claude Lalumière writes about the Story Behind Nocturnes and Other Nocturnes.

All three of these books are available in ebook and print formats from infinity plus:


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