Tag Archives: publishing

Wormhole: November 2022

“Brooke and Brown have crafted a thriller threaded with the complexities that are only possible in Science Fiction.”

Peter F. Hamilton, Sunday Times bestselling author of the Salvation Sequence

A cold-case murder enquiry takes a new turn with revelations about an ill-fated expedition to the stars. A genre mash-up in the first full-length novel from long-time collaborators Keith Brooke and Eric Brown: a corporate thriller, a whodunnit, interplanetary SF, and more.

Wormhole by Keith Brooke and Eric Brown

From the publisher:

Brought to Angry Robot by the John Jarrold Literary Agency, we are delighted to welcome Keith Brooke and Eric Brown with Wormhole, an exciting hard SF/crime crossover. With both Keith and Eric well-known and respected throughout the SFF community for many years, as authors and reviewers alike, they have combined to create a gripping cautionary tale within a corporate conspiracy.

Acquiring Editor Simon Spanton: “Keith and Eric have, individually and together, long been producing exciting, yet thoughtful and carefully crafted SF. So to have the opportunity to publish a new book written by them in tandem is a delight. Wormhole is a twisty interstellar journey through a maze of crime and deceit that grabbed me from the first. As billionaires and corporations come to dominate our efforts to explore beyond Earth it’s also a very apposite SF novel.”

Keith Brooke & Eric Brown: “We’ve collaborated on short fiction for many years, but this is the first full-length novel we’ve produced together. We each know exactly how the other writes, so we can work seamlessly together – but also we manage to continually surprise each other so that any collaboration is unlike anything we could write individually.”

John Jarrold, John Jarrold Literary Agency: “I’ve known both Eric and Keith for many years, and loved their science fiction writing. The depth, involvement and great story-telling – and the universe they have created here – are wonderful. SF at its best.”

Wormhole is published by Angry Robot on 22 November 2022.


Drive Through

A nice start to the new year: a new crime story in the January 2022 issue of Mystery Magazine, available now on Amazon in a paperback edition: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B09P8KJTSJ?tag=infiniplusthe-21 (UK) or https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09P8KJTSJ?tag=infiplusthesffan (US)

“Drive Through” by Keith Brooke: The quirky detective had run through all the standard questions. The vehicle’s make and colour, the driver’s description, the victim of the hit and run … But he had missed one very important question: Did you recognise the driver?

Also available at Kobo and Barnes & Noble.

Mystery Magazine is also available on a 30-day free trial subscription with Kindle Newsstands: https://amzn.to/3rnFs8W
Or from the magazine’s website: https://mysterymagazine.ca/


Revisits: Lord of Stone

One of the most often-repeated pieces of advice to writers is that you should write the book you would want to read, rather than chasing some idea of what readers might be looking for.

That’s good advice for anyone wanting to write their best work, but not necessarily good career guidance. Taking my own career as an example, I started out a little over thirty years ago with a gritty, anguished post-cyberpunk thriller. I followed this with a horror novel that never sold, and then a high-SF duology, and then a fantasy novel about the death of fantasy (and therefore one that didn’t feature a lot of actual fantasy), and then a contemporary crime novel.

If I’d chosen to follow up that first novel with a direct sequel, a top US publisher was willing to publish me at the top of their list, but I held to my artistic principles and followed my muse. No regrets, but my career would have been very different. Hell, if I’d even stuck a little more closely to a single genre groove my career would have been very different. But I genre-hopped and never quite settled – and probably had a far more interesting career as a result.

Anyway, this is a rather long-winded introduction to an idea that occurred to me recently. I’ve written a lot of fiction over the years, and now I’m very far-removed from actually writing those early books. What would it be like to re-read some of them? Would I find that it all came rushing back and it’d be something akin to that umpteenth editing pass where you’re sick of the words you’ve written and don’t believe anyone might find them even vaguely interesting? Or might that distance actually allow me to read the books with fresh eyes?

So I thought I’d give it a go.

I’m not intending to slavishly reread every word I’ve ever written, but there are some interesting concepts back there. Like that fantasy novel about the death of fantasy and belief. It’s an idea that’s been explored elsewhere, of course, but this was my take on it: a story set in the tail end and aftermath of a brutal civil war, where some people rally around faith while others question any kind of god who might allow such carnage. Early drafts went by the title Scar Tissue, and my lead character was called Blair, in acknowledgement of George Orwell, whose Homage to Catalonia was one of the big influences on the setting and dramatic tensions. The novel was a very near miss, with interest from a major publisher taking it right up to the point where it was listed in their Forthcoming Titles catalogue, but internal changes at the company before signatures hit the contract led to it falling through the gaps. After that, it was a difficult book to place – for a variety of reasons, one of which was that it didn’t fit any neat publishing categories, being neither mainstream nor out and out fantasy. It ended up coming out under the title Lord of Stone from Cosmos Books in the US in the late 1990s, and then I republished it through infinity plus a few years ago.

Lord of Stone by Keith Brooke

Rereading it now has been an interesting experience. The book is full of familiar echoes, like a movie rewatched after several years. There are scenes I remember vividly, and others that have surprised me; characters who are like old friends or colleagues, and others who I had totally forgotten.

Within a very short space of time I was totally absorbed in the story of a young man in the thick of a foreign war. First a bystander, Bligh (as I renamed him, because by the time the book came out a certain other Blair figured large in UK political life) soon becomes passionately involved in the struggles of people he has come to know and love; and before long he’s fighting in the international corps, while powerful forces of the old religion close in around him, and he is clearly being marked out as something special. The fantasy element remains ambiguous – just like the characters in the novel, the reader can choose to believe or not, a fine balance that, for me at least, draws me right into Bligh’s struggles to understand what is happening to him.

It’s odd. This is a book I wrote. These are words that occupied a year or more of my life back in the early 1990s. And yet I’ve actually enjoyed reading this novel as much as any other novel I’ve read this year. Does that sound egotistical? Arrogant?

Perhaps. But remember that piece of writing advice. Always write the story you would want to read. And by setting Lord of Stone aside for a couple of decades I find that I’ve given myself enough distance to prove that true. This novel might not have the same resonances, or power to move, for you or anyone else, but for me this is exactly the book I would want to read. And regardless of career trajectory, marketing, or any other aspect of a writer’s life, you can’t really ask for any greater success than that.


Trace: a country where magic is dying out. A country at war with itself. A country where the prophecies of the Book of the World have started to come true.

Bligh: a young foreigner, drawn irresistibly to the war in Trace. A man who has rejected religion, yet appears to be possessed by one of the six Lords Elemental. Bligh thinks he’s going mad, but if he is then it’s a madness shared by others…

‘Satisfying prose … well realised and visualised characters … powerful and vivid portrayal of the conditions of war.’ –Eric Brown

‘Keith Brooke’s prose achieves a rare honesty and clarity, his characters always real people, his situations intriguing and often moving.’ –Jeff VanderMeer

Buy this ebook from: Amazon US – Amazon UK – Barnes and Noble – Kobo – Apple – Smashwords

Buy this book in print (ISBN: 1722889322): Amazon US – Amazon UK – and other booksellers


Ten years of infinity plus

Ten years ago today, the first ebook title from infinity plus was made available. (Well, actually, Amazon lists the publish date as 23rd November rather than the official 24th, because it went through their systems faster than expected and became available a day early.)

In that decade we’ve published a total of 95 infinity plus titles; this figure includes a series of 20 standalone short stories, the infinity plus singles, so that leaves 75 full-length books – novels, collections and anthologies. We’ve also published a further 20 titles in our infinite press imprint.

So I make that a grand total of 115 titles in a decade. Not bad!

Our authors include winners of World Fantasy Awards, Hugos, and most of the other major awards. A fabulous set of people to work with.

And we’re still going strong. We’ve just published a fine collection from Tony Ballantyne (‘Superb’ The Guardian), and we have another collection, including an original novella, from Garry Kilworth in the new year.


New: Story Behind the Book, Volume 2

Just out from the team behind the fabulous upcoming4.me:

Story Behind the Book - Volume 2Story Behind the Book: Volume 2 collects over 30 non-fiction essays from some of the most exciting authors working today. Chronicling the process of writing and editing speculative fiction, these essays provide a unique glimpse behind the scenes.

Contributors include Ellen Ullman, S.M. Wheeler, Laurie Frankel, Paul McAuley, Marcus Sakey, Neal Asher, Ian Tregillis, Edward M. Lerner, Will McIntosh, Madeline Ashby, Nina Allan, Ken Scholes, Keith Brooke, Jasper Kent, Yoon Ha Lee, Ted Kosmatka, Daniel Abraham, Erin Hoffman, Samuel Sattin, Jack Skillingstead, Douglas Nicholas, Paul Tobin, Jill Shultz, Jay Posey, Eric Brown, Samit Basu, Gina X. Grant, Elizabeth Massie, Tom Vater, Django Wexler, Bradley Beaulieu, Jason M. Hough, Lou Morgan, Paul S. Kemp.

Cover art: a photograph of Hoechst stained non-small cell lung cancer cell. Finding cure for cancer is part of daily work for one of our journalists but similarly to Volume 1, all proceeds from Volume 2 will be donated to Epilepsy Action, in our opinion an equally important cause.

Story Behind the Book: Volume 2 is available from:

Contents:

  • Story behind “By Blood” by Ellen Ullman
  • Story behind “Sea Change” by S.M. Wheeler
  • Story behind “Goodbye for Now” by Laurie Frankel
  • Story behind “Quiet War” – “How I wrote the Quiet War novels and stories” by Paul McAuley
  • Story behind “Brilliance”– “Autism, Bourbon and Lies” by Marcus Sakey
  • Story behind “Zero Point” by Neal Asher
  • Story behind “Necessary Evil” by Ian Tregillis
  • Story behind “Fate of Worlds” – “Forty-two years in the making” by Edward M. Lerner
  • Story behind Love Minus Eighty” by Will McIntosh
  • Story behind “iD” by Madeline Ashby
  • Story behind “Stardust” by Nina Allan
  • Story behind “Requiem” by Ken Scholes
  • Story behind “Lord of Stone” by Keith Brooke
  • Story behind “The People’s Will” by Jasper Kent
  • Story behind “Conservation of Shadows” by Yoon Ha Lee
  • Story behind “Prophet of Bones” – “A World Where Creationists Were Right” by Ted Kosmatka
  • Story behind “The Dagger and the Coin” by Daniel Abraham
  • Story behind “Shield of Sea and Space” by Erin Hoffman
  • Story behind “League of Somebodies” by Samuel Sattin
  • Story behind “Life on the Preservation” by Jack Skillingstead
  • Story behind “Something Red” by Douglas Nicholas
  • Story behind “Prepare to Die” by Paul Tobin
  • Story behind “Angel on the Ropes” by Jill Shultz
  • Story behind “Three” by Jay Posey
  • Story behind “Satan’s Reach” by Eric Brown
  • Story behind “Turbulence” by Samit Basu
  • Story behind “The Reluctant Reaper” by Gina X. Grant
  • Story behind “Desper Hollow” by Elizabeth Massie
  • Story behind “The Cambodian Book of the Dead” by Tom Vater
  • Story behind “The Thousand Names” by Django Wexler
  • Story behind “The Flames of Shadam Khoreh” by Bradley Beaulieu
  • Story behind “The Darwin Elevator” by Jason M. Hough
  • Story behind “Blood and Feathers: Rebellion” by Lou Morgan
  • Story behind “A Discourse in Steel” by Paul S. Kemp

Aethernet 10

Just out: the 10th issue of Aethernet, the digital magazine of serial fiction.

Contents:

  • Cosmopolitan Predators! by Tony Ballantyne
  • Gela’s Ring by Chris Beckett
  • Memento by Keith Brooke
  • The Song Giveth… by Harold Gross
  • The Sugar Pill by Libby McGugan
  • Spiderlight by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Buy from Amazon UK
Buy from Amazon US

More details from www.aethernetmag.com.


War Stories Kickstarter: work by Joe Haldeman, Linda Nagata, TC McCarthy, Ken Liu and more

With contributions from Joe Haldeman, Linda Nagata, TC McCarthy, Ken Liu and more, this looks like a really interesting project. And yes, I have a story in there, too: “War 3.01”, a near-future piece exploring social media warfare.

Full details on the War Stories Kickstarter page.

War Stories (cover by Galen Dara)

War Stories cover by Galen Dara

Here’s what they have to say about it:

An anthology of Military SF, exploring how warfare might affect the soldiers and civilians of tomorrow.

War has been speculated about in science fiction literature from the earliest days of the genre. From George Tomkyns Chesney’s The Battle of Dorking and H.G. Well’s War of the Worlds & War In the Air to Robert Heinlein’s Starship Troopers to Karin Traviss’sWess’har Wars series and Dan Abnett’s Embedded, science fiction literature has long had something to say about war. Now, it’s time to tell some new stories. War Stories is an anthology that looks to the modern state and the future of war through the words of some of the best short fiction authors writing today.

Our cover art is by the fantastic, Hugo Award winning artist Galen Dara, who’s worked for such places as Fireside Magazine, Lightspeed MagazineGeek Love and Apex’s own Glitter and Mayhem anthology. She’ll also be contributing some additional, interior artwork.

War Stories isn’t an anthology of bug hunts and unabashed jingoism. It’s a look at the people ordered into impossible situations, asked to do the unthinkable, and those unable to escape from hell. It’s stories of courage under fire, and about the difficulties in making decisions that we normally would never make. It’s about what happens when the shooting stops, and before any trigger is ever pulled.

We’ve grown up reading stories from authors such as Robert Heinlein, Joe Haldeman, Orson Scott Card, Timothy Zahn, C.J. Cherryh, Lois McMaster Bujold and others that have laid the foundations for ‘military science fiction’ as a distinct genre.

We want to tell some different stories. Science Fiction, and military science fiction in particular, is a good look at the world today, where military actions are certainly relevant. We aim to tell some new stories that look at the future of warfare, and the people, robots and aliens involved.

More: the War Stories Kickstarter page.


The story behind… authors on writing their books

Story Behind the BookThe guys over at the excellent Upcoming4.me website have just published a book of essays by speculative fiction authors about the writing of their books, and it’s a book I’m delighted to be a part of, with my own entry about the writing of Genetopia

What’s more, it’s not only a great book for anyone interested in what goes into producing SF and fantasy novels, all proceeds are going to Epilepsy Action, a cause particularly close to my own heart, as EA have been fantastic in supporting my daughter Molly as she faces the challenges presented by the condition.

The ebook is a bargain (I just picked one up from Amazon for less than £2), and a paperback will follow very soon, so why not pick up a copy or two?

Story Behind the Book: Volume 1 collects nearly 40 non-fiction essays on writing and editing speculative fiction written by some of the most exciting authors and editors. Essays cover everything from getting an initial creative burst, worldbuilding, tackling writer’s block, to the final process of publication. Some of the essays are personal, some rather technical but all of them, without an exception, provide an unique and fascinating insight into the mind of an author.

Contributors include Ian Whates, Michael Logan, Mathieu Blais and Joel Casseus, Mark T. Barnes, Lisa Jensen, Lee Battersby, L. E. Modesitt Jr., Keith Brooke, Joanne Anderton, Jo Walton, F.R. Tallis, Ian R. MacLeod, Guy Haley, Gavin Smith, Francis Knight, Eric Brown, Clifford Beal, Susan Palwick, Rhiannon Held, Ben Jeapes, Nina Allan, Mike Shevdon, Mur Lafferty, Norman Lock, Seth Patrick, Gemma Malley, Freda Warrington, Freya Robertson and more.

All proceeds will be donated to Epilepsy Action.


Stickatitivity – a key part of the writer’s toolkit

Someone once said that aspiring writers are easily discouraged, and and followed up by saying “and they should be”. There’s a lot of bitter truth in that: writing is a very up and down business, and it’s certainly not a happy environment for the easily discouraged or the thin-skinned.

There’s also a sad truth in that observation: a lot of writers who have plenty of talent fall by the wayside just because they don’t have the resilience that this business needs.

Over the years I’ve done a lot of work with new writers, and one of the messages I hammer home (perhaps too much) is that stubbornness is a key part of a writer’s toolkit. We’ve all heard the stories of now-bestselling authors whose first novels were rejected dozens of times before finding a home. I’m not in that league, but my own first novel accumulated those rejections until the point where I had the choice of either consigning it to experience and a dusty box in the attic, or sending it to the last publisher on my list, one that really didn’t publish that kind of thing very often at all. I ended up with a three-book deal.

I was struck by this today, when I came across a piece on resilience on the excellent marketing blog, Wordofmouth. Yes, it’s about marketing and business, but the principles are the same. In the blog post, Mitch Joel argues that it’s not about winning or losing, but about resilience; in my experience, and the point I drum home when I’m teaching, it’s not about winning or losing, but about increasing your chances of getting that one victory that makes the big difference.

Pitching a novel isn’t about winning every time, it’s about winning once and resilience/stubbornness is a key part of how you can improve your chances of hitting that one victory that makes the difference between your book appearing, or it being consigned to the attic.


Ebook pricing, again; or “Fifteen quid for an ebook?”

So here’s the situation…

I’m partway through Eric Brown’s crime novel Murder by the Book, and loving it. I’ve been encouraging Eric to write crime for years and now he has and it’s a great read, full of fantastic characters and lovely 1950s London period detail.

And then, yesterday, when I was about to return to it… where in hell was that book? We turned the house upside down, but couldn’t find it. It literally is a mystery. I have every confidence that it will turn up again at some point: accidentally picked up with someone else’s books, knocked under the sofa, whatever.

But I want to know what happens next!

Simple, I thought: I popped over to Amazon to get a copy for my Kindle, happy to spend a few quid just so I could keep reading without break.

Two problems with that, though:

  1. Although the hardback came out in March, the ebook won’t be out until July. What reason is there for this? There can’t be a logistical explanation: the ebook hardly needs physically shipping to distributors, and it’s not exactly labour-intensive to produce; I’m sure the file is just sitting there, gathering virtual dust while it awaits publication. I can’t see any way they would gain sales by the delay; if anything they’d lose them, as people like me go looking for the book, find it’s unavailable, and then move on to other things.
  2. It’s priced at £14.90. Come again? Fifteen quid for an ebook? This is where I’m completely baffled by the publishers’ policy. Who do they think is going to buy an ebook at that price? Is there some kind of logic that says “While it looks good to have an ebook version available, we don’t want people to actually buy this format”…?

I get the reasoning for pricing the hardback at £19.99. Presumably the vast majority of sales at this price are to the library market, and the higher price makes sense given that each copy of the book will get multiple readers. But £15 for an ebook at Amazon? I’d love to know which part of the market publishers Severn House are targeting with this strategy.

The only possible explanation I can think of is that they think potential buyers will be horrified at the price and opt to buy the slightly more expensive hardback instead. But that makes no sense: the profit margin on the hardback is so much lower, because of production and distribution costs. They could price the ebook for a fiver and make just about as much as they make from the hardback, and they’d actually, erm, sell copies.

An Eric Brown crime ebook at £5 would sell. If anyone could explain to me how even a novel as good as this is will sell ebooks at £15 I’d love to be enlightened.


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