Category Archives: infinity plus

Ten years of infinity plus

Ten years ago today, the first ebook title from infinity plus was made available. (Well, actually, Amazon lists the publish date as 23rd November rather than the official 24th, because it went through their systems faster than expected and became available a day early.)

In that decade we’ve published a total of 95 infinity plus titles; this figure includes a series of 20 standalone short stories, the infinity plus singles, so that leaves 75 full-length books – novels, collections and anthologies. We’ve also published a further 20 titles in our infinite press imprint.

So I make that a grand total of 115 titles in a decade. Not bad!

Our authors include winners of World Fantasy Awards, Hugos, and most of the other major awards. A fabulous set of people to work with.

And we’re still going strong. We’ve just published a fine collection from Tony Ballantyne (‘Superb’ The Guardian), and we have another collection, including an original novella, from Garry Kilworth in the new year.


New: Midway by Tony Ballantyne

Midway by Tony Ballantyne

Stories about stories and storytelling.

Written on the road between the past and the future, a writer explores his relationship with his dying father.

Literature, fantasy and science fiction come together in this unique and very personal piece.

Tony Ballantyne is the author of the acclaimed Penrose hard SF novels, Twisted Metal and Blood and Iron, as well as the groundbreaking and surreal fantasy novels Dream London and Dream Paris.

‘Sharp, touching, and very original, this collection uses stories of different genres to explore aspects of the same emotional landscape, creating a very personal and very satisfying whole.’ Chris Beckett, winner of the Arthur C Clarke Award

Buy this ebook from: Amazon US – Amazon UK – Barnes and Noble – Kobo – Apple – Smashwords

Buy this book in print (ISBN: 9798670868549): Amazon US – Amazon UK – and other booksellers


Fictions: All I Asked For by Anne Charnock

Published today, over at the Future Care Capital website: All I Asked For by Anne Charnock – a powerful and moving story about the impact of technological intervention in pregnancy.

This is the second story in our year-long Fictions project: short stories exploring near-future issues in health and social care. The first, published last month, was Stephen Palmer’s Goodbye; next month it’s my turn, and in October we have a story by Liz Williams. All the stories are illustrated by Vincent Chong.

Fictions:
Disease tourism, uses of virtual reality in care, widening adoption of self-diagnosis apps… Four authors and one artist, working with the Future Care Capital charity, explore the near-future. Running July 2020 to June 2021, one story a month takes a key issue in health and social care and examines its implications for people on the ground: patients, carers, practitioners and all those close to them. Thought-provoking and challenging, Fictions presents world-class fiction intended to inspire debate and new thinking among practitioners and policy-makers.

Fictions:
Four writers, one artist, twelve futures.

Fictions

Find out more about the project, and read the first two stories, on the Future Care Capital website.


Fictions: Health and Care Re-Imagined

Four SF authors, one artist, twelve stories – exploring near-future issues in health and social care.

Fictions

Launching today, Fictions is a monthly series of short SF stories produced in collaboration between four authors, one artist, and a UK charity working with practitioners and policy-makers in the health and social care sector.

The brief was simple, and so obvious it really should have been done lots of times before: a charity looking for innovative ways to encourage its audience to move away from conventional patterns of thinking in order to consider how the near future might really be, brainstorming and developing ideas with a group of creatives whose job it is to do exactly that.

As writers, we spend our time looking for the surprises and twists, the gotcha moments; we identify moments in a sequence of events that pull you up in your tracks and make you rethink. That’s one of the key elements in a good story: the building of a scenario and then what I call the rug-pull moment, when the rug is yanked from beneath the reader’s feet and they’re forced to reassess all that has gone before.

And this is what Future Care Capital asked us to do. Surprise them, and the people they work with. Make them stop in their tracks and see things from other perspectives.

It’s been a fascinating project to work on, from the early discussions with FCC about the topics and challenges they see in the next decade or two of health and social care, to working with the writers – Anne Charnock, Stephen Palmer and Liz Williams – and artist, Vincent Chong, to discuss these topics, and look for stories that would meet the brief of being challenging and surprising… writing fictions that provoke.

And above all, turning what might start out as dry, academic discussions into believable realities. Because once you have compelling and surprising stories with characters you care about and challenges that are real you can go anywhere… which is exactly what we were asked to do.

Fictions opens today with Stephen Palmer’s ‘Goodbye’, a story about technological innovations in supporting those at the end of life. In August, Anne Charnock takes us back to the beginning of life, with a look at uses of technology in conception and birth. And from there, who knows? Four authors, one artist, and twelve stories, exploring beginnings and ends, and all that lies in between.

Find out more about the project, and read the first story, on the Future Care Capital website.


Published today: The Conscientious Objector by Stephen Palmer

The Conscientious Objector by Stephen Palmer

Buy this ebook from: Amazon US – Amazon UK – Barnes and Noble – Kobo – Apple –  Smashwords

Buy this book in print (ISBN: 1795806745): Amazon US – Amazon UK – and other booksellers

1914.

With the outbreak of war on the Continent, Erasmus Darwin finds himself caught up in a jingoistic fervour for which he feels no sympathy. Yet soon he is on the Western Front: frightened, appalled, and alone apart from a few pals who don’t understand his pacifism.

Soon however he finds himself entangled in a secret mission the like of which has never been attempted, one which stretches his pacifism to the limit…

A unique and thought-provoking alternative history of the First World War from the author of Beautiful Intelligence and the Factory Girl trilogy.

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The Factory Girl trilogy:

“I would highly recommend this to any steampunk lover…” SFF World
“It’s a fascinating book and I very much enjoyed it.” Nimue Brown
“As the first in a series this novel is pretty special… a thoroughly enjoyable and interesting read.” Goodreads
“Provides an exciting ride trhough a clockwork version of Edwardian England, leading to a conclusion that brings together the various themes in a satisfying way.” Amazon
“This is all good thought provoking stuff, that I thoroughly enjoyed…” Goodreads


Also published in December 2019:

2nd editions of the entire Factory Girl trilogy, with stunning new covers by Tom Brown:

The Girl with Two Souls (The Factory Girl Trilogy #1) by Stephen Palmer The Girl with One Friend (The Factory Girl Trilogy #2) by Stephen Palmer The Girl with No Soul (The Factory Girl Trilogy #3) by Stephen Palmer

The Girl with Two Souls (The Factory Girl Trilogy #1) by Stephen Palmer is available from: Amazon US – Amazon UK – Amazon Canada – Barnes and Noble – Kobo – Apple – Smashwords

The Girl with One Friend (The Factory Girl Trilogy #2) by Stephen Palmer is available from: Amazon US – Amazon UK – Amazon Canada – Barnes and Noble – Kobo – Apple – Smashwords

The Girl with No Soul (The Factory Girl Trilogy #3) by Stephen Palmer is available from: Amazon US – Amazon UK – Amazon Canada – Barnes and Noble – Kobo – Apple – Smashwords


Published today: The Autist by Stephen Palmer

The Autist by Stephen Palmer

Buy this ebook from: Amazon US – Amazon UK – Barnes and Noble – Kobo – Apple –  Smashwords

Buy this book in print (ISBN: 1795806745): Amazon US – Amazon UK – and other booksellers

‘This is first class SF.’ — Tony Ballantyne

Data detective Mary Vine is visiting relatives when she uncovers a Chinese programme of AI development active within her own family.

Ulu Okere has only one goal: to help her profoundly disabled brother, whose unique feats of memory inspire her yet perturb the community they live in.

And in a transmuted Thailand, Somchai Chokdee is fleeing his Buddhist temple as an AI-inspired political revolution makes living there too dangerous.

In 2100 life is dominated by vast, unknowable AIs that run most of the world and transform every society they touch. When suspicions of a Chinese conspiracy seem substantiated, Mary, Ulu and Somchai decide they must oppose it. Yet in doing so they find themselves facing something the world has never seen before…

‘This pretty much hits my sweet spot for intelligent science fiction: a deft twisting together of warring AIs, rogue androids, and the evolution of machine intelligence against a global backdrop that’s as thoughtful as it is entertaining.’ — Gary Gibson

‘A gripping read to the poignant last line.’ — Eric Brown on Beautiful Intelligence, The Guardian

‘His work is unique, original, sometimes challenging, always fresh.’ — Amazing Stories

‘One of the most inventive and imaginative Fantasy writers I know of.’ — Teresa Egerton


New: TOMMY CATKINS by Stephen Palmer

TOMMY CATKINS by Stephen Palmer

1915
Following a horrific experience at Verdun, Private Tommy Catkins – shell-shocked and suffering head injuries – is sent to a mysterious island hospital in Wiltshire, where he is subjected to the primitive treatments of the era.

But the island appears to be a portal to the enigmatic land of Onderwater, where lives a race of blue-skinned people with tails.

Will Tommy be tempted by Onderwater, or will the love of Nurse Vann pull him back to reality, and recovery?

“One of the most inventive and imaginative fantasy writers I know of…” Teresa Edgerton

Buy this ebook from: Amazon US – Amazon UK – Amazon Canada – Barnes and Noble – Kobo – Apple – Smashwords

Buy this book in print (ISBN: 0995752265): Amazon US – Amazon UK – Amazon Canada – and other booksellers

New: The Spacetime Pit Plus Two by Stephen Baxter and Eric Brown

The Spacetime Pit Plus Two by Stephen Baxter and Eric Brown

The Spacetime Pit Plus Two by Stephen Baxter and Eric BrownThe Spacetime Pit Plus Two collects three collaborative stories by two of science fiction’s finest writers. Never before published in one volume, the triptych showcases the authors’ ability to create narratives on a vast scale, and yet never to lose sight of the all-important human element.

In the award-winning ‘The Spacetime Pit’, spacer Katerina Wake crash-lands on a primitive alien world and faces certain death unless she can harness her ingenuity, and technical know-how, to bend the destiny of an entire race to her will…

‘Green-Eyed Monster’ follows Richard as he wakes up after a night on the tiles to find himself inhabiting the body of a toad – and that’s just the start of his troubles…

In ‘Sunfly’, Onara and her people live on a world very different from our own – a vast ribbon encircling a sun. But a change is coming to the land, a mysterious narrowing that threatens not only the stability of her world, but the very order of everything she has taken for granted.

Buy this ebook from: Amazon US – Amazon UK – Barnes and Noble – Kobo – Apple– Smashwords

Buy this book in print (ISBN: 0995752257): Amazon US – Amazon UK – and other booksellers
*Please note that due to a glitch at Amazon the UK print edition was not available at the time of publishing this post; Amazon are investigating and we’re hoping it will go live very soon!

“With every passing year, the oft-made remark that Baxter is Arthur C Clarke’s heir seems more and more apt” – SFX

“Eric Brown spins a terrific yarn” – SFX 

“There’s real beauty and excitement to Baxter’s writing” – Starburst

“British writing with a deft, understated touch: wonderful” – New Scientist on Eric Brown


Two new paperbacks from Garry Kilworth

Published today: the first ever paperback editions of two landmark collections from Garry Kilworth (described by New Scientist as “arguably the finest writer of short fiction today, in any genre” and by Fear as “one of the most significant writers in the English language”).

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Moby Jack and Other Tall Tales by Garry Kilworth

Moby Jack and Other Tall TalesMoby Jack and Other Tall Tales is a collection of stories that span some 20 years. They cover a variety of themes and are more different, in style as well as content, than they are similar. As the author himself says, “Some writers follow a path of sameness in order to satisfy their readers’ desire for familiarity. To me that’s like going to same country for your holiday every year. It’s not me. I like going somewhere different every time.”

The tales range from Chinese fantasy (‘Death of the Mocking Man’) to science fiction (‘Moby Jack’), to fantasy (‘The Sculptor’) to horror (‘The Megowl’) to ghost stories (‘Hunter’s Hall’) – but for the most part they’re just plain odd and refuse to slot into any set category.

This edition of Moby Jack also includes the previously uncollected ‘When the Music Stopped’ by Christian Lehmann and Garry Kilworth.

So, if you like weird stories, dark comedy and tales where characters get into impossible situations and only occasionally extract themselves, then you’ll probably enjoy this volume.

Buy this book (ISBN: 0995752230): Amazon US – Amazon UK – and other booksellers

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Tales from the Fragrant Harbour by Garry Kilworth

gkfhThese short stories were all penned in and around Garry Kilworth’s time in Hong Kong.

The collection is split half-and-half into general fiction stories and supernatural tales. They were all inspired by the people and places of that magical effervescent city, not forgetting its surrounding mountains and countryside, and the myriad islands that come within its sphere. There are tales from Chinese viewpoints and stories about the lives of expatriates.

If you read no other general fiction stories, then you must try ‘Typhoon’ with its fearless heroine the indomitable Elizabeth, or the imperturbable reptile catcher from ‘The Snake-Man Cometh’. If your taste is not for the fantastic, you would be poorer in spirit for not experiencing the poignancy of ‘The Hungry Ghosts’ and ‘Memories of the Flying Ball Bike Shop.’

If you have never been to Hong Kong, enter it page by page. If you have, retrace its familiar corners.

There’s plenty of variation to satisfy most readers’ literary appetites. Fans of elegant short fiction and Far Eastern culture will find this very worthwhile reading.

Buy this book (ISBN: 0995752249): Amazon US – Amazon UK – and other booksellers

“Garry Kilworth is arguably the finest writer of short fiction today, in any genre.” (New Scientist)

“His characters are strong and the sense of place he creates is immediate.” (Sunday Times)

“Kilworth is a master of his trade.” (Punch)

“Kilworth is one of the most significant writers in the English language.” (Fear)


Kit Reed: The Story Until Now

Terribly sad to report the passing of friend, family, and also infinity plus author, Kit Reed.

Over on Facebook, Keith Brooke posted this:


Kit Reed saw something in me, and for the longest time I puzzled over what it might be. Why me? What was it that elevated me to the level of someone Kit noticed and included? Kit, who so sadly died at the weekend, surrounded herself by truly great people, to the extent that it was impossible for her to tell an anecdote without it sounding like namedropping – but for Kit and Joe, “When Joss said this”, “When Daniel stayed over”, “When Sigourney/Chip/Brian dropped in”, this was normal, day to day life. So, Kit Reed, legendary writer of stories no-one else could even approach being able to write, had seen something in me and brought me into her fold.

Over the years, Kit and I did so much together, it seemed. She was a constant in my life, always enriched it, and was an absolute inspiration. We’d go for weeks without talking, then there would be flurries of messaging by email, MOO, Facebook or whatever the current medium was. Bitchy, insightful, wonderfully funny; supportive, warm, and always telling stories – life was story to Kit.

So many happy, inspiring memories of meeting up with Kit and Joe over the years. Dinners with friends and family. Sitting in the sun while Joe sketched Colchester Castle in his hardbound notebook and we’d all share stories and plans. That time after spending too long with a rather boorish colleague when we hid away in that splendid Lawn Avenue house and watched Guardians of the Galaxy like giggling schoolkids. All those evenings when I’d get home from my dayjob and log on to the online environment where I was guesting on Kit’s anonymous writing class and we’d spend hours debating and fine-tuning story with ‘the kids’. Turning up at London’s Reform Club and being refused entrance because the only pair of trousers I had that weren’t jeans were still too jeans-like for their dress code – Joe had to come down and wrangle my entrance with his don’t-dare-mess-with-me charm, and then we sat at a table with a view and watched the comings and goings of the club’s members for hours. Lunch in the Algonquin, and then chatting on the train ride all the way back up to New Haven, Kit managing to simultaneously provide a running commentary on the passing scenery, tell brilliantly funny stories, and write story critiques on her tiny laptop along the way. And, our most recent visit, Debbie and I stopping over in the wonderful Middletown house on the first proper night of our honeymoon, Kit taking us through the steps of cooking and eating lobster because she knew we’d be eating an awful lot of it on our three-week drive around New England. And we did. We ate an awful lot of lobster and we ate it well, because Kit knew exactly how to equip us for our journey with the most important skills – and just how many of Kit’s students, collaborators, friends and colleagues can say exactly that? She equipped us all.

The real lesson is, Kit didn’t just see something in me. She saw it in everyone (except for the fakes: she was merciless with them). We were all special to her, and all capable of genius, of greatness in our lives, and she was adept at bringing that out in people. Kit just happened to be one of those people who delivered greatness on a daily basis.

Kit, just as you wished, you’ll be remembered in the spaces, those gaps when you would have chipped in with a story, those pauses when someone else would have been sympathetic and you’d just tell us to get the hell on with what needs doing, the times when there’s no message from you waiting in the in box any more.

And now, as Kit would no doubt tell me, I have work to do, stories to tell, and no-one else is going to tell my stories but me.

I think it was Mack who described us all as Kit’s co-conspirators in life. I can’t think of a better description, and I’m incredibly proud to have been a co-conspirator with Kit.

Friend, collaborator, family, inspiration, and sorely missed.


Of course, one of the best ways to celebrate an author is to read their work, and for Kit, the best way to do this would be to dip into her ‘Great big book of stories’, The Story Until Now (Wesleyan), or her latest novel, Mormama (Tor, published this summer). She was bloody good.


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