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All three volumes of Stephen Palmer’s Factory Girl trilogy now available

Published 6th December 2016, part three of The Factory Girl trilogy:

The Girl with No Soul by Stephen Palmer

Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UK
Paperback: Amazon USAmazon UK – CreateSpace

The Girl with No Soul by Stephen Palmer

It is 1911.

Returning to Britain from Africa, Erasmus and Roka find themselves thrown into a perilous sequence of chase, capture and escape. Yet they must return to Sheffield as fast as they can, and in secret, there to prepare for an inevitable confrontation inside Sir Tantalus Blackmore’s Factory.

But it is not only Sir Tantalus whom they must face. As the British Army, automaton horrors, and a band of desperate Marxist engineers converge around the Factory, Erasmus and Roka must decide who to trust and who to work with…

Can they overcome the fiendishly complex defences of the Factory? Will the diabolical agents of the Clockwork Garden stop them, or will Sir Tantalus himself step in? Who, in the end, will reach the heart of the Factory to learn its terrible secrets?

The final part of a breathtaking adventure through an alternative Edwardian Britain and beyond, where clockwork automata and their makers threaten to change the world forever.

“A gonzo homage to the late Victorian/Edwardian British adventure yarn… imagine Michael Palin and Terry Jones’ Ripping Yarns doing a Steampunk episode with a large helping of early 70s British prog-rock psychedelia, some very peculiar flying machinora, and a chocolate train… Stephen Palmer is a writer you should read. His work is unique, original, sometimes challenging, always fresh and sometimes barking… Hairy London is strange, mad, subversive and possibly just a little bit dangerous. You won’t have encountered a vision of London like it.” Amazing Stories

“Stephen Palmer is a find.” Time Out

“Stephen Palmer’s imagination is fecund…” Interzone

“…a thrilling chase across a ravaged Europe, a burgeoning North Africa and balkanised US, interleaving excellent action set-pieces with fascinating philosophising on the nature of consciousness. A gripping read to the poignant last line.” The Guardian, on Beautiful Intelligence

Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UK
Paperback: Amazon USAmazon UK – CreateSpace

The Factory Girl trilogy by Stephen Palmer


Stephen Palmer’s Factory Girl trilogy: the first reviews

The Girl with Two Souls by Stephen Palmer

The first reviews for Stephen Palmer’s fabulous alt-Edwardian steampunk romp, the Factory Girl trilogy, are starting to appear and it’s looking good! Great to see books like these getting such a positive response.

“I would highly recommend this to any steampunk lovers” SFF World

The Girl with Two Souls captures the feel of the Edwardian era whilst also introducing the fantasy and steampunk elements in a very natural manner… a very well written and enjoyable book” SFF Chronicles

 

The Girl with Two Souls ebook: Amazon USAmazon UK
Paperback: Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace

The Girl with One Friend ebook: Amazon USAmazon UK 
Paperback: Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace 

The Girl with No Soul: published 6th December 2016

The Factory Girl trilogy by Stephen Palmer


New from Stephen Palmer: The Girl with Two Souls

Published 22nd November 2016, part one of The Factory Girl trilogy:

The Girl with Two Souls by Stephen Palmer

Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UK
Paperback: Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace

Part two to be published 29th November; part three to be published 6th December.

The Girl with Two Souls by Stephen PalmerEdwardian Britain: 1910.

Kora Blackmore, thrown into Bedlam mental hospital by her father – Britain’s leading industrialist Sir Tantalus Blackmore – is one day visited by a mysterious gentleman, who gains her trust then makes off with her to his family home in Sheffield. But Kora is afflicted with a bizarre condition, that the hospital believes is a second soul – the girl Roka – somehow living inside her.

Roka however is much more feisty than Kora, and far less obliging. Soon she is caught up in street politics, disorder and protest – and all without Kora’s knowledge.

With the agents of Sir Tantalus closing in, Kora and Roka must survive in their new circumstances and with their friends uncover the sequence of events leading to the incarceration in Bedlam; for although Kora is an illegitimate nobody, it seems her upbringing was devised to meet an enigmatic and ghastly end…

“A gonzo homage to the late Victorian/Edwardian British adventure yarn… imagine Michael Palin and Terry Jones’ Ripping Yarns doing a Steampunk episode with a large helping of early 70s British prog-rock psychedelia, some very peculiar flying machinora, and a chocolate train… Stephen Palmer is a writer you should read. His work is unique, original, sometimes challenging, always fresh and sometimes barking… Hairy London is strange, mad, subversive and possibly just a little bit dangerous. You won’t have encountered a vision of London like it.” Amazing Stories

“Stephen Palmer is a find.” Time Out

“Stephen Palmer’s imagination is fecund…” Interzone

“…a thrilling chase across a ravaged Europe, a burgeoning North Africa and balkanised US, interleaving excellent action set-pieces with fascinating philosophising on the nature of consciousness. A gripping read to the poignant last line.” The Guardian, on Beautiful Intelligence

Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UK
Paperback: Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace

The Factory Girl trilogy by Stephen Palmer


New: The Quarantined City by James Everington

ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKAmazon CanadaBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwords
paperback: Amazon USAmazon UKAmazon CanadaCreateSpace – and other booksellers

The Quarantined City by James EveringtonThe Quarantined City: sealed off from the outside world, with only the sight of the ocean to remind its inhabitants of life beyond. No one knows why the city has been quarantined and conspiracy theories abound.

But for Fellows life continues largely as before. He walks the streets, hunts out rare books; the sun continues to shine and the gulls circle above.

There’s the small matter of the ghost haunting his house, but Fellows doesn’t let himself think of that.

But when he tracks down a story by the reclusive writer known as Boursier, his old certainties fade as he becomes aware that the secrets of the city, the ghostly child, and the quarantine itself, might be more connected than he thinks…

“There is an edge of Murakami here, we are in a world just slightly skewed from our own but all the more foreign for that. Everington has a crystal clear prose style, reminiscent of JG Ballard but, like China Miéville, twisted toward the gothic…” Damien G Walter

“Good writing gives off fumes, the sort that induce dark visions, and Everington’s elegant, sophisticated prose is a potent brew. Imbibe at your own risk.” Robert Dunbar, author of The Pines and Martyrs & Monsters

“Everington is excellent at evoking a mounting sense of unease, turning to dread, that close, oppressive feeling when everything is still and ordinary, but the whole world is filled with the sense that something huge and terrible is just about to happen.” Iain Rowan, author of One Of Us and Nowhere To Go

ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKAmazon CanadaBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwords
paperback: Amazon USAmazon UKAmazon CanadaCreateSpace – and other booksellers

Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboApple – Smashwords

The Quarantined City by James Everington


New from Eric Brown: The Fall of Tartarus (first ebook edition)

Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboApple – Smashwords

ebtfotIn myth Tartarus was the lowest region of hell. In reality it is a world about to die…

I’d heard many a tale about Tartarus Major, how certain continents were technological backwaters five hundred years behind the times; how the Church governed half the planet with a fist of iron, and yet how, across scattered islands and sequestered lands, a thousand bizarre and heretic cults prospered too.

I’d heard how a lone traveller was hardly safe upon the planet’s surface, prey to wild animals and cut-throats. Most of all I’d heard that Tartarus was a dying world, one that would be annihilated when its sun exploded in the magnificent stellar suicide of a supernova.

These are the stories of the people who are leaving Tartarus, those have decided to stay and those who are arriving on the planet for the apocalypse.

This ebook edition also features an afterword by the author.

“Eric Brown spins a terrific yarn” SFX

“This is the rediscovery of wonder” Stephen Baxter on Helix

“SF suffused with a cosmopolitan and literary sensibility” Paul McAuley

“British writing with a deft, understated touch: wonderful” New Scientist

Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboApple – Smashwords

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New: Expatria – the boxed set, by Keith Brooke

Available for the first time in a single volume: the Expatria duology.

Expatria: the boxed setBook one:
The descendants of Expatria’s first colonists from Earth have rejected technology. When Mathias Hanrahan, heir to the primacy of Newest Delhi, wants to reintroduce the old ways he is framed for his father’s murder and forced to flee.

Recruited by a research team which is trying to relearn the ancient technologies, he goes to work for them, and against a background of impending war, Mathias discovers that strange messages are coming from space.

Book two:
For Katya Tatin, a passionate believer in and employee of the Holy Corporation of GenGen, the opportunity to join the mission to the recently rediscovered colony of Expatria is much more than a chance to spread the gospel. For her, it represents a break with the past on Earth, with the Consumer Wars and the subversives who seek to undermine the standing of the Holy Corporation itself. It offers a chance to reconfirm her faith.

On Expatria itself, and on the ancient arkships that orbit it, the news of the impending arrival of a mission from Earth further complicates an already murderously complex web of religious and political intrigue. For some, it looks like salvation from a backward-looking, superstition-ridden society; for others, it looks suspiciously like an invasion.

Amazon US – Amazon UK

Keith Brooke at infinity plus

On Expatria:

“Its carefully measured, consciously understated prose eschews any of the customary cheap stunts used by genre authors in an attempt to keep the reader whizzing through the pages … To describe it as gripping would be accurate but would at the same time mislead: it grips because of the reader’s absorption in the characters and the significance of the events rather than through any nonstop pulse-racing action. It introduces you to a world which, without your perhaps consciously realizing it, comes to permeate your mind, so that you have to shake your head to return yourself to 21st-century Earth … Brooke’s tale-telling is superb … a completely absorbing novel.” Hugo and World Fantasy Award winner John Grant

“Book of the Month … The mix of semi-pastoral life and scientific research is convincingly handled … The underlying conflict between religion and science is finely wrought … an absorbing piece of fiction. Highly recommended.”Gamesmaster International

“Books like this are proving that the British can write SF as good as any American… This is a marvellous book that, despite the sequel … is a complete novel in itself. Treat yourself: buy both, and read them over and over.” Nexus

“Brooke lies somewhere between Peter Dickinson and Barrington J Bayley in his novels: he tells one story, concentrating on one set of characters, while great events go on around them that are almost peripheral to their lives, but he does it with intense concentration and understanding … Brooke is an author well worth reading … I hope some publisher over here makes him available to American audiences.” Locus

“…brought beautifully to life … I enjoyed this book a great deal and will definitely buy the sequel.” Critical Wave

On Expatria Incorporated:

“For Katya, a devout apparatchik of the Holy Corporation of GenGen, her voyage to newly colonised Expatria is a chance to confirm a faith that has been undermined by her rebellious brother. That subversion, though, has only just begun in a story that brilliantly shows a world in which religious belief is used to secular advantage—where creeds are implanted along with genes.” The Times

“I have to admit to being truly astonished that this book, which is a direct sequel to Expatria, is neither simply the second half of one long story nor is it a lazy reworking of the first in a slightly different form. What we have here is a first-class novel of character that just happens to be set on the same world and use some of the same characters as the first novel. Keith Brooke has achieved something quite rare, in that the characters who we first met and saw grow and change in the first novel we now encounter and, knowing where they are coming from, can watch and enjoy and see them grow and change anew when their society changes due to new and different pressures. The first novel was of pressures from within, this one is of pressure from without, and both explore the effects superbly.” Nexus


New: ebook editions of Stephen Palmer’s first three novels

Just out from infinity plus:

Memory Seed by Stephen Palmer
Glass by Stephen Palmer Flowercrash by Stephen Palmer

Memory Seed

There is one city left, and soon that will be gone, for the streets of Kray are crumbling beneath a wave of exotic and lethal vegetation threatening to wipe out the last traces of humanity. In the desperate struggle for survival most Krayans live from day to day, awaiting salvation from their goddesses or the government. A compelling first novel set on a world both deadly and fascinating.

“The exotic horticulture is as inventive as anything in Aldiss’ classic Hothouse, and parallels with present environmental concerns aren’t bludgeoned home… Palmer is a find.” Time Out

Amazon US – Amazon UK – Barnes and Noble – Smashwords

Glass

A plague is spreading through the city of Cray. Nobody knows its origin and nobody has discovered a cure. Cray is dying. Of glass. As the city’s ruling council resorts to increasingly desperate measures to maintain order, two people’s lives are about to change…

“Blending good science fiction with an elegant exploration of the relationship between humans and their ancient electronic creations, Palmer’s tale is littered with characters who behave in an ultimately believable way… This is a brilliant second novel and makes, like its predecessor, a welcome change in a genre clogged with tat.” SFX, Guy Haley *Best Original SF novel of the year: Guy Haley’s choice in SFX

Amazon US – Amazon UK – Barnes and Noble – Smashwords

Flowercrash

Zaïdmouth’s five communities are intertwined by artificial flower networks so complex they combine to create the virtual realities through which Zaïdmouth is run. Yet into this vivid world a bad seed is about to be sewn. Set in a vibrant future world, Flowercrash is the new novel from the acclaimed author of Memory Seed and Glass.

“I would urge science fiction fans to read the novel… It’s an exciting and thought provoking story that is well worth seeking out.” Aural Innovations

Amazon US – Amazon UK – Barnes and Noble – Smashwords

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