Tag Archives: iain rowan

Stumbling into print

Working on Garry Kilworth’s fabulous new novel, The Iron Wire (due later this month – watch this space), I was struck by how many excellent books I’ve worked on at infinity plus, and in particular, how many of them now have print editions. I thought I’d write a blog post to highlight some of them, and explain how we kind of sidestepped into print editions, having initially set out as an ebook-only publisher.

But then, I thought… it’s not fair to pick out individual titles to highlight like this, particularly when it’s the range of titles that had struck me. So instead, here’s the complete listing of print titles.

Note: while I hope that you’ll enjoy these books wherever you buy them (and I’m delighted that independent bookstores are stocking our books), authors get the most financial benefit if you buy from Createspace.

infinity plus: titles by format: print

Ordered by release date

See also: books from our infinite press imprint

An old era is drawing to a close, a new era about to begin, and the great mage Donn has passed on his Talents to a new generation. When a rogue church leader threatens to set loose wild powers, Donn’s children must oppose him but, also, they must contend with Donn himself: the old mage has not finished with his children yet. A fantasy epic of revolution, jealousy and earth-shattering magic. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsWeightless Books
Print (ISBN: 1500976466): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Rites of PassageRites of Passage by Eric Brown
Rites of Passage gathers four long stories from a British Science-Fiction Award-winning author. Stories of a Victorian London facing the threat of alien invasion, a strange world where the sun is fixed eternally overhead, the struggle to survive in a near-future post-apocalypse, and a far-future Earth where giant crabs and a swollen sun threaten humanity’s very existence. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwords
Print (ISBN: 1499500319): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Hairy LondonHairy London by Stephen Palmer
What is love? One evening at the Suicide Club three gentlemen discuss this age-old problem, and thus a wager is made. Dissolute fop Sheremy Pantomile, veteran philosopher Kornukope Wetherbee and down-on-his-luck Velvene Orchardtide all bet their fortunes on finding the answer amidst the dark alleys of a phantasmagorical Edwardian London. But then, overnight, London Town is covered in hair… (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwords
Print (ISBN: 1495995224): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Nocturnes and Other NocturnesNocturnes and Other Nocturnes by Claude Lalumière
Nocturnes and Other Nocturnes: Twenty-five dark stories that span a daring breadth of genres. In these noir tales that unfold at the edge of realism, mythic nocturnes from impossible pasts, and disquietingly intimate stories of speculative fiction, Claude Lalumière explores our collective and intertwined obsessions with sex and death. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwords
Print (ISBN: 1494461978): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Strange MammalsStrange Mammals by Jason Erik Lundberg
Strange superheroes and the magic of the quotidian; stories of piercing darkness and quirky, surreal humor; writing from the heart and soul; phantasmagorical journeys into what it means to be human. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwords
Print (ISBN: 1492363685): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
The Fabulous BeastThe Fabulous Beast by Garry Kilworth
A set of beautifully crafted tales of the imagination from “the best short story writer in any genre” (New Scientist). (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading CompanySpacewitch
Print (ISBN: 1490339604): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Falling OverFalling Over by James Everington
Sometimes when you fall over you don’t get up again. And sometimes, you get up to find everything has changed. Ten stories of unease, fear and the weird from James Everington. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading CompanySpacewitch
Print (ISBN: 1490339132): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
SalvageSalvage by Eric Brown
The Salvageman Ed series of linked stories – four of which appear here for the first time – combine action, humour and pathos, from the master of character-based adventure science fiction. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading CompanySpacewitch
Print (ISBN: 1490339051): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Parallax ViewParallax View by Keith Brooke and Eric Brown
Stories that examine the interface between human and alien – a parallax view from two of Britain’s top science fiction writers, both shortlisted for the 2013 Philip K Dick Award. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboApple
Print (ISBN: 1481009052): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
On my way to Samarkand: memoirs of a travelling writerOn my way to Samarkand: memoirs of a travelling writer by Garry Kilworth (writing as Garry Douglas Kilworth)
Garry Kilworth’s books include SF and fantasy, historical novels, literary novels, story collections, children’s books and film novelisations. This autobiography covers family history, travels and his experiences in publishing. ‘A master of his trade’ (Punch) (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1480208299): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Red Dot IrrealRed Dot Irreal by Jason Erik Lundberg
Once you enter the surreal worlds of Lundberg’s equatorial fantastika, a part of you will never leave. “A fine meal for the mind awaits you in Lundberg’s collection” (Jonathan Carroll) (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1492364894): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
The Alchemy of HappinessThe Alchemy of Happiness by Jason Erik Lundberg
A triptych of stories rooted in Asian myth and legend, literary fantasy at its very best from the author of Red Dot Irreal, plus a hybrid essay on the transformative power of speculative fiction. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1492379212): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
GenetopiaGenetopia by Keith Brooke
The wilds: a world where genes mutate and migrate between species through plague and fever, but that’s where Flint must go… “A minor masterpiece that should usher Brooke at last into the recognized front ranks of SF writers” (Locus) (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1480192406): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
What happens when every wish you make is immediately granted by God? If you could use the power of music to travel through time? If your body was the battleground for a strange, alien invasion? In turns humorous, lyrical, profound – but always entertaining – these are the haunting tales of an author at the height of his power. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1480298131): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
One of UsOne of Us by Iain Rowan
Anna fled her own country when the police murdered her brother and her father, but now, in a world of people trafficking, prostitution and murder, she must decide how much she is prepared to give up to be one of us? Shortlisted for the UK Crime Writers’ Association Debut Dagger award. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1470075768): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
GhostwritingGhostwriting by Eric Brown
Over the course of a career spanning twenty five years, Eric Brown has written just a handful of horror and ghost stories – and all of them are collected here. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 147010086X): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
From cyberpunk visions of post-human futures to traditional tales of alien encounter and time travel, ten science fiction stories from the two times winner of the BSFA short story award. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1479242047): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Nowhere To GoNowhere To Go by Iain Rowan
Eleven stories of murder, obsession, fear and – sometimes – redemption, from a writer shortlisted for the UK Crime Writers’ Association’s Debut Dagger award. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1475127863): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
One More UnfortunateOne More Unfortunate by Kaitlin Queen
Relentlessly drawn back to a circle of old friends and enemies, Nick Redpath has all kinds of issues to deal with. But first he must prove that he didn’t murder his old flame, Geraldine Wyse… (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1470068273): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers

Guest post: 52 Songs, 52 Stories by Iain Rowan

52 Songs, 52 StoriesIt was quite a simple idea. Every week for a year, I’d set iTunes to shuffle, let it pick the next song at random, and then I’d sit down and write a story inspired by that song and publish it on the web.

In part it was a bit of fun, but in part it was also a really useful lesson about discipline, and not waiting for inspiration. I was working on a novel at the same time, plus the usual family and day job commitments, so I didn’t have much time to spare. No time for writer’s block. No time for procrastination. No time for mulling over ideas or scrapping and starting again, no time for second or third drafts. Just listen. Write. Quick scan for typos. Publish.  Repeat.

There were times when it was hard, but I learned a lot about not waiting for inspiration, instead just writing and writing until something took shape, and I could discard what I didn’t need, and keep what felt right. Just start writing, and trust that something would come. It’s always a satisfying feeling to have written, but it’s even better when the writing process itself is enjoyable. I enjoyed writing the stories for 52 Songs most when the words and ideas just flowed, as if already shaped before I thought them. But exactly where was all this coming from?

Some of my favourite stories from the project are those that just seemed to appear from… somewhere. Re-reading the year of stories with a critical eye, I can’t see a difference in quality between the ideas I sweated over, and those which arrived, fully formed, almost before I knew it. I’ve always been cynical about the idea of waiting for the muse, as it’s an excellent excuse not to write and I really don’t need any more of those. Sometimes though, in those moments when the ideas just rush in from nowhere, I can at least imagine the muses gathered in a corner, nodding approvingly.

But that’s just an all-too human trait of ascribing outside agency, to what comes from within. I’ve always been fascinated by how we can better feed the subconscious, stoke up its fires and let it run riot with its tools: everything we have ever been, or thought, or known.

I’m also fascinated by how we listen to what it’s telling us. That’s the trick, and creative artists have found many ways to do it: long walks in the country with the dog, long walks inside their head with drugs, running (or in my case, cycling) long and hard, drinking long and hard, losing themselves in music, the shower or the bath, staring out of windows on trains. The endless chattering monkey mind settles for a moment or two, the subconscious seizes its chance, there’s a shuffling and a clicking, the puzzle pieces move a little further into place, and the words flow.

Of course, as soon as the hard work of revision starts, the muses and your subconscious all shrug, pretend to look busy, and mutter, ‘You’re on your own now, pal’. But for 52 Songs, 52 Stories, I learned better ways of getting that first part out, and onto the page.

52 Songs, 52 Stories is available now:

Eleven questions, eleven answers

Okay, so thanks to the inestimable Iain Rowan, I’ve somehow got roped into one of those meme-things that spread like herpes around the blogosphere. What you have to do is…

Give eleven facts about yourself, answer eleven questions set by the person who’s prompted you, then set another eleven questions for eleven more people. Eventually, as Iain says, everyone in the world answers it and then the world ends, or something.

Well, I’m not so sure about roping in another eleven victims, but here’s my attempt to answer…

Eleven facts, all true, apart from the ones that I made up. And if anyone identifies which are true and which not, I’ll send a copy of my Philip K Dick Award nominated alt.human (confusingly called Harmony in North America) to the first to get it right.

1. I nearly became a chartered accountant, but chose not to because… well do I really need to give all the reasons?
2. I’m a distant relative of Walt Disney.
3. I used to play in a band and one of my songs was used as the soundtrack for a Carpet Warehouse TV ad.
4. I was arrested for shoplifting with friends when I was nine years old; one of my friends, whose name I can’t recall, got off with it because he cried when we were caught, but Gavin and I didn’t buckle and got a good telling off, and then we ran away from home to live in the woods.
5. I once stood for election to the local council, but was heavily beaten.
6. My fingers used to bend far enough backwards to touch the back of my hand, but now they’re too stiff.
7. I had an operation to remove an extra toe when I was about 18 months old – it had to go because it curled under my foot and made walking painful. If you get me drunk enough I’ll show you the scar. Whether you want to see it or not.
8. I am not from Norfolk.
9. Beetroot, yum.
10. I have a PhD in creative writing.
11. It has done me no good at all.

And eleven answers to the same number of questions.

1. What is the single thing you are most proud of having written?
Ooh… tempting to give a flippant answer, but if I’m serious it would have to be The Unlikely World of Faraway Frankie – a short fantasy novel where I think I get the closest I’ve ever managed to writing what I set out to write.

2. If your latest novel or story had a soundtrack by one artist, who would that be?
Bizarrely, the first name that comes to mind is 80s electro-popster Howard Jones. I think he’d nail it. Radiohead would be good, too, or Muse (although I’m not a huge fan of theirs these days).

3. Flight, or invisibility? Choose one.
Telepathy, definitely.

4. Have you ever secretly based one of your characters on a real-life person, just so you can kill them off?
Oh yes! In alt.human/Harmony there’s one guy who gets eaten alive by tiny alien bugs. Slowly. And another guy who gets badly beaten up by some bigger aliens. They had it coming.

5. Do you get more upset when one animal is harmed in a film than a hundred people?
Depends on the animal, depends on the people.

6. What’s the worst film version of a good novel that you have ever seen, and why?
Do you know, I’m struggling to think of one? The two worst films I’ve ever seen are the second Sex and the City and Did you Hear About the Morgans? I dread to think what the novels of those would have been like, if they’d ever existed.

7. What is the single thing that scares you more than anything else? I don’t mean the essential futility of life, fragility of family and all the real things, I mean the embarrassing thing that still completely creeps you out? My wife has repeatedly run into a clown collecting money recently, and that is a very good example.
I’m terrified of heights and water, but that’s perfectly normal, isn’t it? Ventriloquists’ puppets have always terrified me, ever since I had one of those far too realistic dreams as a kid where I opened my eyes and watched one of the damned things walking, all stiff-limbed and red-cheeked and grinny, across my bedroom floor towards me. I woke up just as it reached me and fully expected it to be there, and that I’d just blinked.

8. What’s the one book that you wished you had written?
For art’s sake, almost anything by Ian McEwan. For materialist, living in comfort’s sake, Fifty Shades of Grey. For mischief’s sake, the first four Harry Potter books, and then I’d have left everyone dangling and refused to carry on because I was bored.

9. If you owned some variety of sports team, and had to design your own strip, what would it be like?
I’d own Manchester United and make them play in mankinis and high heels.

10. A choice: big money and sales as a ghost writer, or cult figure but poor under your own name?
Both. Or that’s the plan!

11. Dolphin or manatee?
With mayo or ketchup? It makes all the difference.


The Penny Dreadnought Files: Transcript of the Debriefing of Agent #742C – a guest post by Mr Everington

“So, what can you tell us about these so called ‘Abominable Gentlemen’, Agent #742C?”

“It’s worse than we thought, sir.”

“What do you mean? I thought they were just writers?”

“Well sir…”

“And not even proper writers, but – and I can barely bring myself to say this – genre writers. People fixated not just on what isn’t, but on what can never be.”

“I’m not sure how we could ever truly know what can never be, sir”

“This isn’t a philosophy class Agent #742C. This is you telling me whether these Gentlemen really are Abominable. Or Gentlemen. What are they each like individually, when they’re not calling themselves damn silly names?”

Alan Ryker is a cad, Sir, and Iain Rowan a rotter; Aaron Polson is a ruffian, and James Everington a n’er-do-well.”

“Hmmm. And are they really writers, or is it all just a cover for nefarious activities?”

“Well they do publish fiction sir. Both separately, but also as a group in a series of themed anthologies called Penny Dreadnought…

“Well, it’s a nice title I give ‘em that. But no – genre writers. Can’t be any good.”

“And they’ve recently published all sixteen stories from the first four volumes in an Omnibus volume, sir. You can buy it on places like Amazon and Amazon UK – I’ve checked and it is legitimate sir. Proper artwork and formatting and all that. But…”

“But,  Agent #742C?”

“But I don’t believe a word of it sir! They’re supposed to be horror writers! This Penny Dreadnought thing should contain stories about zombies or romantically inclined were-bats! That’s what horror readers want, isn’t it? It’s what Mrs #742C reads sir, and…”

Penny Dreadnought“I have no desire to learn the squalid secrets of your marriage, Agent #742C. So if it’s not that sort of thing, what sort of stories does this Penny Dreadnought Omnibus contain?”

“There’s ambiguity sir. Things that are unclear and make you think, long after you’ve finished the story… and… ”

“Don’t falter now Agent #742C.”

“And strong prose and characterisation – like real books! There’s even stories based on the theme of ‘epistemic doubt’ sir! They reference Descartes.”

“Good Lord!”

All the stories are like that sir. Literate and street-smart”

“You’re right, these can’t possibly be horror writers! What possible justifications can they give?”

“They claim they are part of a long line of ‘literate horror’ sir…”

“Wash your mouth out Agent 742C!”

“… which includes such people as Shirley Jackson, T.E.D. Klein, and Algernon Blackwood sir. They claim they grouped together as the ‘Abominable Gentlemen’ because they all shared similar sensibilities as writers, and wanted to band together to put out the best of their stories…”

“I don’t think I’ve ever come across a case as bad as this before. I don’t mind admitting to feeling some nausea.”

“They claim publishing their work together in this way allows them to increase their audience and allows their readers to find new and exciting authors. Further issues might even feature guest Gentlemen sir, of either gender, who are also writers of unashamedly high-brow horror…”

“I think I’ve heard enough. You’ve read this abomination – what do you suggest we do Agent #742C?”

“Nuke the site from orbit Sir?”

“Oh, you will go far Agent #742C.”

The first Penny Dreadnought anthology is available now and more information is available on the PD website. The Gentlemen themselves have been conspicuous by their absence since this debriefing took place, but hope to be bringing you more tales of nefariousness soon.



Now in print: Nowhere To Go by Iain Rowan

Nowhere to Go by Iain RowanNow available in a stylish trade paperback: Iain Rowan’s Nowhere To Go collects together stories previously published in Alfred Hitchcocks’ Mystery Magazine, Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine and other top magazines and anthologies, and includes the Derringer Award-winning short story “One Step Closer”.

Recently shortlisted for a Spinetingler award for Best Short Story Collection, Nowhere To Go is available in ebook and print editions from:

Trade paperback
CreateSpace ($10.99)
amazon.com ($10.99)
amazon.co.uk (£6.99)
Ebook
amazon.com (Kindle format, $2.99)
amazon.co.uk (Kindle format, £1.99)
Smashwords (various formats, including epub, mobi, Sony and PDF, $2.99)

“A short story writer of the highest calibre.”
— Allan Guthrie, author of Top Ten Kindle Bestseller Bye Bye Baby, winner of Theakston’s Crime Novel of the Year


Update on UK pricing for our print editions – good news!

One of Us by Iain RowanI posted recently about the unsatisfactory distribution – and erratic pricing – of our print editions in the UK. Prices were higher, with high postage rates; and just to complicate matters, prices could vary widely week to week; and all of this was beyond our control at infinity plus.

We have some very good news on this: CreateSpace (our print-on-demand supplier) and Amazon (our main distributor) have finally got their European act together!

Now you can order our print editions from Amazon’s UK and other European stores for a price we’ve set, with the advantage of Amazon’s normal delivery options (including free).

So what’s stopping you? Right now we have the following available:

  • Iain Rowan’s CWA Debut Dagger-shortlisted crime novel One of Us, at £7.99
  • Eric Brown‘s collection of psychological horror stories, Ghostwriting, which contains some of his finest writing to date, at £6.99
  • And bestselling children’s author Kaitlin Queen‘s first adult novel One More Unfortunate, at £7.99

Coming soon we’ll have Iain Rowan’s crime collection, Nowhere to Go, recently shortlisted by Spinetingler for a best crime collection award, plus more to be announced soon.

Ghostwriting by Eric BrownNowhere to Go by Iain RowanOne More Unfortunate by Kaitlin Queen


Great review for Iain Rowan’s One Of Us

Lovely review of Iain Rowan’s CWA Debut Dagger-shortlisted novel, One of Us:

“enough satisfying twists and turns to satisfy any crime fan… An excellent novel”
http://indieebookreview.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/one-of-us-by-iain-rowan/

One of Us is available from:
CreateSpace (paperback $11.99)
Amazon US (paperback $11.99)
Amazon UK (paperback £14.99)
Book Depository (paperback £7.45 – cheapest UK option we’ve found!)
amazon.com (Kindle format, $2.99)
amazon.co.uk (Kindle format, £1.99)


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