Category Archives: jason erik lundberg

Fish Eats Lion: new print edition of Singaporean speculative fiction anthology

Just out – the first infinity plus print edition of Fish Eats Lion, edited by Jason Erik Lundberg:

Fish Eats Lion: Singaporean speculative fictionFish Eats Lion collects the best original speculative fiction from Singapore – fantasy, science fiction, and the places in between – all anchored with imaginative methods to the Lion City. These twenty-two stories, from emerging writers publishing their first work to winners of the Singapore Literature Prize and the Cultural Medallion, explore the fundamental singularity of the island nation in a refreshing variety of voices and perspectives. This anthology is a celebration of the vibrant creative power underlying Singapore’s inventive prose stylists, where what is considered normal and what is strange are blended in fantastic new ways.

“Lundberg combines accessibility with a uniquely Singaporean flavor in his selections. SF readers looking to expand their horizons will enjoy visiting new worlds from an unaccustomed point of view.” – Publishers Weekly

“I doubt I’ll read a more engaging collection this year. […] There’s a rich optimism to be found here that speaks of lesser-known spec-fic writers rising to a challenge, and that challenge being more than adequately met.” – Pete Young, Big Sky

“Entertaining in this post-colonial era, it hints at how storytellers can become mythmakers, with the power to change the world.” – Akshita Nanda, The Straits Times

Buy this book in print (ISBN: 1502984822): Amazon USAmazon UKAmazon CanadaCreateSpace – and other booksellers

Also available as an ebook from: Amazon USAmazon UK – Barnes and NobleKoboApple – Smashwords


Stumbling into print

Working on Garry Kilworth’s fabulous new novel, The Iron Wire (due later this month – watch this space), I was struck by how many excellent books I’ve worked on at infinity plus, and in particular, how many of them now have print editions. I thought I’d write a blog post to highlight some of them, and explain how we kind of sidestepped into print editions, having initially set out as an ebook-only publisher.

But then, I thought… it’s not fair to pick out individual titles to highlight like this, particularly when it’s the range of titles that had struck me. So instead, here’s the complete listing of print titles.

Note: while I hope that you’ll enjoy these books wherever you buy them (and I’m delighted that independent bookstores are stocking our books), authors get the most financial benefit if you buy from Createspace.

infinity plus: titles by format: print

Ordered by release date

See also: books from our infinite press imprint

An old era is drawing to a close, a new era about to begin, and the great mage Donn has passed on his Talents to a new generation. When a rogue church leader threatens to set loose wild powers, Donn’s children must oppose him but, also, they must contend with Donn himself: the old mage has not finished with his children yet. A fantasy epic of revolution, jealousy and earth-shattering magic. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsWeightless Books
Print (ISBN: 1500976466): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Rites of PassageRites of Passage by Eric Brown
Rites of Passage gathers four long stories from a British Science-Fiction Award-winning author. Stories of a Victorian London facing the threat of alien invasion, a strange world where the sun is fixed eternally overhead, the struggle to survive in a near-future post-apocalypse, and a far-future Earth where giant crabs and a swollen sun threaten humanity’s very existence. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwords
Print (ISBN: 1499500319): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Hairy LondonHairy London by Stephen Palmer
What is love? One evening at the Suicide Club three gentlemen discuss this age-old problem, and thus a wager is made. Dissolute fop Sheremy Pantomile, veteran philosopher Kornukope Wetherbee and down-on-his-luck Velvene Orchardtide all bet their fortunes on finding the answer amidst the dark alleys of a phantasmagorical Edwardian London. But then, overnight, London Town is covered in hair… (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwords
Print (ISBN: 1495995224): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Nocturnes and Other NocturnesNocturnes and Other Nocturnes by Claude Lalumière
Nocturnes and Other Nocturnes: Twenty-five dark stories that span a daring breadth of genres. In these noir tales that unfold at the edge of realism, mythic nocturnes from impossible pasts, and disquietingly intimate stories of speculative fiction, Claude Lalumière explores our collective and intertwined obsessions with sex and death. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwords
Print (ISBN: 1494461978): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Strange MammalsStrange Mammals by Jason Erik Lundberg
Strange superheroes and the magic of the quotidian; stories of piercing darkness and quirky, surreal humor; writing from the heart and soul; phantasmagorical journeys into what it means to be human. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwords
Print (ISBN: 1492363685): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
The Fabulous BeastThe Fabulous Beast by Garry Kilworth
A set of beautifully crafted tales of the imagination from “the best short story writer in any genre” (New Scientist). (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading CompanySpacewitch
Print (ISBN: 1490339604): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Falling OverFalling Over by James Everington
Sometimes when you fall over you don’t get up again. And sometimes, you get up to find everything has changed. Ten stories of unease, fear and the weird from James Everington. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading CompanySpacewitch
Print (ISBN: 1490339132): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
SalvageSalvage by Eric Brown
The Salvageman Ed series of linked stories – four of which appear here for the first time – combine action, humour and pathos, from the master of character-based adventure science fiction. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading CompanySpacewitch
Print (ISBN: 1490339051): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Parallax ViewParallax View by Keith Brooke and Eric Brown
Stories that examine the interface between human and alien – a parallax view from two of Britain’s top science fiction writers, both shortlisted for the 2013 Philip K Dick Award. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboApple
Print (ISBN: 1481009052): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
On my way to Samarkand: memoirs of a travelling writerOn my way to Samarkand: memoirs of a travelling writer by Garry Kilworth (writing as Garry Douglas Kilworth)
Garry Kilworth’s books include SF and fantasy, historical novels, literary novels, story collections, children’s books and film novelisations. This autobiography covers family history, travels and his experiences in publishing. ‘A master of his trade’ (Punch) (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1480208299): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Red Dot IrrealRed Dot Irreal by Jason Erik Lundberg
Once you enter the surreal worlds of Lundberg’s equatorial fantastika, a part of you will never leave. “A fine meal for the mind awaits you in Lundberg’s collection” (Jonathan Carroll) (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1492364894): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
The Alchemy of HappinessThe Alchemy of Happiness by Jason Erik Lundberg
A triptych of stories rooted in Asian myth and legend, literary fantasy at its very best from the author of Red Dot Irreal, plus a hybrid essay on the transformative power of speculative fiction. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1492379212): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
GenetopiaGenetopia by Keith Brooke
The wilds: a world where genes mutate and migrate between species through plague and fever, but that’s where Flint must go… “A minor masterpiece that should usher Brooke at last into the recognized front ranks of SF writers” (Locus) (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1480192406): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
What happens when every wish you make is immediately granted by God? If you could use the power of music to travel through time? If your body was the battleground for a strange, alien invasion? In turns humorous, lyrical, profound – but always entertaining – these are the haunting tales of an author at the height of his power. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1480298131): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
One of UsOne of Us by Iain Rowan
Anna fled her own country when the police murdered her brother and her father, but now, in a world of people trafficking, prostitution and murder, she must decide how much she is prepared to give up to be one of us? Shortlisted for the UK Crime Writers’ Association Debut Dagger award. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1470075768): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
GhostwritingGhostwriting by Eric Brown
Over the course of a career spanning twenty five years, Eric Brown has written just a handful of horror and ghost stories – and all of them are collected here. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 147010086X): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
From cyberpunk visions of post-human futures to traditional tales of alien encounter and time travel, ten science fiction stories from the two times winner of the BSFA short story award. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleKoboAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1479242047): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
Nowhere To GoNowhere To Go by Iain Rowan
Eleven stories of murder, obsession, fear and – sometimes – redemption, from a writer shortlisted for the UK Crime Writers’ Association’s Debut Dagger award. (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleAppleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1475127863): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers
One More UnfortunateOne More Unfortunate by Kaitlin Queen
Relentlessly drawn back to a circle of old friends and enemies, Nick Redpath has all kinds of issues to deal with. But first he must prove that he didn’t murder his old flame, Geraldine Wyse… (…more)
Ebook: Amazon USAmazon UKBarnes and NobleSmashwordsRobot Trading Company
Print (ISBN: 1470068273): Amazon USAmazon UKCreateSpace – and other booksellers

new: Fish Eats Lion – New Singaporean Speculative Fiction, edited by Jason Erik Lundberg

Fish Eats Lion - New Singaporean Speculative Fiction edited by Jason Erik LundbergFish Eats Lion collects the best original speculative fiction from Singapore – fantasy, science fiction, and the places in between – all anchored with imaginative methods to the Lion City.

These twenty-two stories, from emerging writers publishing their first work to winners of the Singapore Literature Prize and the Cultural Medallion, explore the fundamental singularity of the island nation in a refreshing variety of voices and perspectives.

This anthology is a celebration of the vibrant creative power underlying Singapore’s inventive prose stylists, where what is considered normal and what is strange are blended in fantastic new ways.

[Note: This ebook edition does not include Stephanie Ye’s “The Story of the Kiss”, only available in the print edition.]

Ebook available from: Amazon US – Amazon UK – Barnes and Noble – Kobo –Apple – Smashwords

“Lundberg combines accessibility with a uniquely Singaporean flavor in his selections. SF readers looking to expand their horizons will enjoy visiting new worlds from an unaccustomed point of view.” – Publishers Weekly

“I doubt I’ll read a more engaging collection this year. […] There’s a rich optimism to be found here that speaks of lesser-known spec-fic writers rising to a challenge, and that challenge being more than adequately met.” – Pete Young, Big Sky

“Entertaining in this post-colonial era, it hints at how storytellers can become mythmakers, with the power to change the world.” – Akshita Nanda, The Straits Times


Some nice mentions for infinity plus books

Fabulous review of Jason Erik Lundberg’s Strange Mammals from the Guardian:

“Jason Erik Lundberg’s third collection, Strange Mammals, gathers 25 short stories in which literary naturalism gives way to the surreal, the absurd and the magical… Lundberg has the enviable talent of achieving emotionally resonant effects within just a few pages.” Guardian

Meanwhile, James Everington was recently interviewed at Ravenous Reads, the piece introduced with this lovely reference to James’ recent infinity plus collection Falling Over:

“another fantastic collection which showed off Mr. Everington’s skills in the short fiction arena and made him a star in my eyes”

And over at Upcoming4.me this week, Claude Lalumière writes about the Story Behind Nocturnes and Other Nocturnes.

All three of these books are available in ebook and print formats from infinity plus:


Guest post: Jason Erik Lundberg on the strangest of mammals

Strange Mammals by Jason Erik LundbergHuman beings are strange mammals. Just thought I’d get that out of the way.

In the animal kingdom, all mammals eat, sleep, mate, and fight to defend themselves. (This, of course, applies to non-mammalian animals as well.) But human beings are the only type of mammal that also questions their own existence and identity. Who are we? Why are we here? What are we supposed to do with the limited time allotted to us?

Evolutionarily speaking, intuitively, this is exceedingly odd. On the face of it, wondering what you want to be when you grow up should actually interfere with, rather than aid with, your continued survival; debating the merits of becoming a fireman versus an astronaut is not entirely helpful if a lion is chewing through your stomach. But this strange and constant questioning has actually done the opposite, and led to human beings, as comedian Louis CK famously pointed out, successfully pulling ourselves out of the food chain. We have survived as a species not in spite of this preoccupation, but because of it.

These questions have spurred on both miraculous innovation and horrific atrocities, but regardless of the results, they are at the fundamental heart of humanity. Literature is one of the few avenues so thoroughly equipped to examine these questions, and speculative fiction is particularly keen, through its slanted focus, on transcending mere fact and approaching truth. (Although anyone with a definitive answer is selling something.)

My very first story was published ten years ago, but I was writing with the active goal of publication for the decade before that, and writing because it was a joyful and fulfilling activity for the decade before that. In all of that time, my fiction has approached these fundamental questions in various ways, lightly or heavily, obliquely or head-on. It is a life-long project, what Zoran Zivkovic calls “the noble art of fiction writing”.

Take the title story of my new collection, Strange Mammals (published this month in paperback and ebook formats by Infinity Plus). The central animals that the protagonist encounters over the course of the narrative—a wombat, an ocelot, a fictional Borgesian catoblepas—can be seen as various aspects of the narrator’s psyche, but the wonderful (and, yes, noble) thing about this kind of story is the ambiguity that allows for all these bizarre animals, and others besides, to exist independent of mere mental projection. This dual existence, which is only possible within the arena of the fantastic, opens up those fundamental questions to scrutiny. If an alcoholic talking wombat with a penchant for Greek food can take over our lives so completely with its forceful personality, where does that then place us on the food chain? Can we still think of ourselves as existentially superior in the face of such a creature? Or else, if it only exists as a hallucination, what does its presence mean for human consciousness itself?

This may elevate literature (and my own in particular) to too lofty a height. After all, stories have to entertain, right? (And, in all honesty, “Strange Mammals” is probably the funniest story I have ever written; it’s difficult for me to read it even silently without bursting into laughter.) One must be engaged with the story or else it becomes discarded in favor of an endless number of diversions and distractions. But this entertainment factor is what makes the fiction so profoundly lasting, that viral insistence which leads to the injection of higher considerations.

What could be stranger than that?

“Jason Erik Lundberg’s stories, launched from the real world on a trajectory to the surreal, fuse the idle daydream with the desperate heart. You should read them.”
John Kessel, author of The Baum Plan for Financial Independence and Other Stories

The Strange Mammals ebook is available from: Amazon US – Amazon UK – Kobo – Apple – Smashwords

And the print edition: Amazon US – Amazon UK – CreateSpace

New: Strange Mammals by Jason Erik Lundberg

Strange Mammals by Jason Erik LundbergJust out, in print and ebook formats:

The fabulous Strange Mammals by Jason Erik Lundberg.

I really shouldn’t rave about individual titles – I genuinely love all the books we put out, otherwise why bother? But I did particularly enjoy this one – a real treat for anyone who loves stylish, strange contemporary fantasy.

Also out; new print editions of two earlier titles, Red Dot Irreal and The Alchemy of Happiness.


Hell’s a Good Joke: Jason Erik Lundberg on the inspiration behind The Alchemy of Happiness

The Alchemy of Happiness, by Jason Erik LundbergIt all started with a sculpture.

In 1999, when I was still an unpublished newbie, I attended the World Horror Convention in Atlanta, where some of the notable writer guests included Neil Gaiman, John Shirley, Michael Bishop, Caitlín R. Kiernan, and Ramsey Campbell. At that point, I thought that I might still be a horror writer, even though my innate squeamishness for violence and terror was beginning to win the battle for my chosen subject matter, and I attended very much because of the writers there. However, on the second day of the convention, at the urging of several new friends, I made my way into the art show, and beheld the gloriously dark and whimsical sculpture work of Lisa Snellings, who was the Artist Guest-of-Honor. Her smaller pieces made me smile and her larger kinetic works (including the moving Ferris wheel that inspired the anthology Strange Attraction, edited by Edward E. Kramer) filled me with wonder, but it was her largest piece on display that literally stole the breath from my lungs.

Named “If Love’s a Fine Game, Hell’s a Good Joke,” the sculpture consisted of two life-sized harlequins, one balancing on the knees of the other; the expressions that Lisa had so painstakingly crafted on their faces were so devilish and sly that, right there on that spot, I conceived of the siblings Blue and Dane: immortals, manipulators, elementals.

When I got home from the convention, I immediately cast these two characters in a novelette called “Wicked Game” (which can be found in my ebook collection The Curragh of Kildaire). The story examined the shifting balance of control that comes with power both earned and taken; it also established the borstal plane, a dimension of existence that both acts as a prison and as the source of all the magic in the world, a locale I would visit again in my prose. I later returned to the siblings in a middle-grade story called “Watersnake, Firesnake,” but this time put them in a distinctly Asian setting, as the antagonists of a young boy who has found a phoenix egg.

Several years passed, and I grew as a writer, and Blue and Dane refused to go away, insisting that I hadn’t yet finished telling their story. It took time, but three substantial works of fiction came into existence that further explored the power dynamics of their relationship, and the consequences of their long-term meddling in human affairs.

The Alchemy of Happiness is the result, an interwoven tripartite narrative collecting “Reality, Interrupted,” “In Jurong,” and “Always a Risk” for the very first time.

Red Dot Irreal, by Jason Erik LundbergThe collection’s title riffs on that of the ancient Islamic text Kimiya-yi Sa’adat by the Sufi philosopher Abu ?amid Mu?ammad ibn Mu?ammad al-Ghazali, as well as the science of alchemy that sought to harness the four classical elements (two of which my characters physically embody). However, whereas al-Ghazali’s text was designed as a moral guide toward a more fulfilling spiritual life, mine is open-ended, a question rather than an answer. Through their constant searching, will Blue and Dane ever find that existential bliss toward which all of us are striving? Or will their millennia of manipulation and destruction leave them forever in a state of metaphysical suffering?

The Alchemy of Happiness is available now from infinity plus book. Also included in this ebook volume is a hybrid-essay called “Embracing the Strange,” which looks at my own personal journey for happiness and fulfillment through the lens of speculative fiction, as well as a wide-ranging interview by Singaporean author and editor Wei Fen Lee.

And as a special bonus, anyone who buys the ebook gets a link to download the expanded second edition of my collection Red Dot Irreal completely for free.


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